Stories about: microbiome

Another microbiome perspective: The host holds the leash

Abstract depiction of the microbiome

Most scientists and clinicians accept that the human microbiome impacts a person’s nutrition, immune system function, physical health and perhaps even mental illness, but exactly how or why is not well understood. Now, taking an evolutionary approach, a Boston Children’s Hospital infectious disease researcher suggests the host may play a more active role in controlling the microbiome than previously appreciated.

“I think we need to re-evaluate the way in which we think about the microbiome,” says Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, a physician-scientist at Boston Children’s in the Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology, whose perspective was published today in Nature.

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Could fecal transplants heal Crohn’s and colitis in children? Two trials are set to find out

two trials test fecal transplant in Crohn's and colitis in children

Could an exciting potential treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) be found in the gastrointestinal tract itself? That’s the theory behind a pair of new studies by Stacy A. Kahn, MD, which will investigate the potential role of fecal microbial transplant (FMT) in the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis in children.

In IBD, the immune system attacks healthy cells in the digestive tract, triggering symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, poor growth and bloody diarrhea. Children with IBD can also experience problems elsewhere in the body, including joint pain, liver disorders and eye inflammation.

Known colloquially as the “poop pill,” or “stool transplant,” FMT harnesses growing knowledge about the gut microbiota, the collection of bacteria and other microbes that populate our GI tract.

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News Notes: Pediatric science roundup

A quick look at recent research Vector finds noteworthy.

Tracking infants’ microbiomes

cute microbes-shutterstock_317080235-croppedMicrobiome studies are blooming as rapidly as bacteria in an immunocompromised host. But few studies have been done in children, whose microbiomes are actively forming and vulnerable to outside influences. Two studies in Science Translational Medicine on June 15 tracked infants’ gut microbiomes prospectively over time. The first, led by researchers at the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital, analyzed DNA from monthly stool samples from 39 Finnish infants, starting at 2 months of age. Over the next three years, 20 of the children received at least one course of antibiotics. Those who were repeatedly dosed had fewer “good” bacteria, including microbes important in training the immune system. Overall, their microbiomes were less diverse and less stable, and their gut microbes had more antibiotic resistance genes, some of which lingered even after antibiotic treatment. Delivery mode (cesarean vs. vaginal) also affected microbial diversity. A second study at NYU Langone Medical Center tracked 43 U.S. infants for two years and similarly found disturbances in microbiome development associated with antibiotic treatment, delivery by cesarean section and formula feeding versus breastfeeding.

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Microbiome therapeutics: 6 takeaways from a MassBio panel

microbiome therapeuticsSeeing the surprising success of “poop pills” in gastrointestinal C. difficile infection, pharma companies and startups are embracing the microbiome as a new therapeutic target for an astonishing range of maladies. To learn what pioneering companies in the space are thinking about the hope and the hype, Vector recently attended a panel on microbiome therapeutics at the MassBio Annual Meeting.

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Probing the link between autism, GI disorders and the microbiome

autism microbiome
(Dubova/Shutterstock)

Sonia A. Ballal is an attending physician in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Eleven-year-old Lyle has autism and doesn’t speak, but his mother is used to reading his nonverbal cues. He prefers a routine, but has always been a generally cheerful child who enjoys school and playing with his little sister.

Several weeks before I met Lyle (not his real name), his mother observed a dramatic shift. He was agitated, at times hitting his head against the wall, not receiving his typical sunny reports from school.

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Of bugs, genes, development and intestinal biology

genes intestinal developmentThe collection of bacteria and other microorganisms living in our intestines—our microbiota—is now understood to play an important role in our physiology. Recent research indicates that it helps regulate our metabolism, immune system and other biological processes, and that imbalances in the microbiota are associated with everything from inflammatory bowel disease to diabetes.

Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, wants to take this understanding to a new level. An infectious disease clinical fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, he has systematically probed how genetics interact with environment—including the microbiota—to shape intestinal biology during different stages of development.

His investigations provide interesting clues to disorders that have their origins early in life, ranging from necrotizing enterocolitis in newborns to Hirschsprung’s disease (marked by poor intestinal motility) to food allergies.

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Biomarkers for all

Just about any measurable molecule that changes with health and disease could be a biomarker. (David Guo's Master/Flickr)

Your doctor has a lot of tools to detect, diagnose and monitor disease: x-rays, MRIs, angiography, blood tests, biopsies…the list goes on.

What would be great would be the ability to test for disease in a way where there’s no or low pain (not invasive) and lots of gain (actionable data about the disease process itself, its progression and the success of treatment).

That’s where biomarkers come in.

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