Stories about: microglia

Microglia’s role in brain development: A neuroscientist looks back

The journal Neuron, celebrating its 25th anniversary, recently picked one influential neuroscience paper from each year of the publication. In this two-part series, we feature the two Boston Children’s Hospital’s scientists who made the cut. The Q&A below is adapted with kind permission from Cell Press.

Microglial cell with synapses
CAUGHT IN THE ACT: This microglial cell is from the lateral geniculate nucleus, which receives visual input from the eyes. The red and blue are synapses that it has engulfed. (Blue synapses represent inputs from the same-side eye; red, the opposite-side eye.)

In 2012, Beth Stevens, PhD, and colleagues provided a new understanding of how glial cells shape healthy brain development. Glia were once thought to be merely nerve “glue” (the meaning of “glia” from the Greek), serving only to protect and support neurons. “In the field of neuroscience, glia have often been ignored,” Stevens told Vector last year.

No longer. Stevens’s 2012 paper documented that microglia—glial cells best known for their immune function—are no passive bystanders. They get rid of excess connections, or synapses, in the developing brain the same way they’d dispatch an invading pathogen—by eating them.

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