Stories about: microptosis

Microptosis: Programmed death for microbes?

trypanosoma parasites immune defense apoptosis microptosis
Trypanosoma parasites in a blood smear. (CDC)

Of the various ways for a cell to die — necrosis, autophagy, etc. — apoptosis is probably the most orderly and contained. Also called programmed cell death (or, colloquially, “cellular suicide”), apoptosis is an effective way for diseased or damaged cells to remove themselves from a population before they can cause problems such as tumor formation.

“Apoptosis has special features,” says Judy Lieberman, MD, PhD, an investigator in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine. “It’s not inflammatory, and it activates death pathways within the cell itself.”

Conventional wisdom holds that apoptosis is exclusive to multicellular organisms. Lieberman disagrees. She thinks that microbial cells — such as those of bacteria and parasites — can die in apoptotic fashion as well. In a recent Nature Medicine paper, she and her team make the case for the existence of what they’ve dubbed “microptosis.” And they think it could be harnessed to treat parasitic and other infections.

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