Stories about: midaortic syndrome

Bypassing a narrowed midaorta with a living, growing graft

Midaortic syndrome is marked by narrowing of the middle section of the aorta.

By the time he arrived at Boston Children’s Hospital, the 6-month-old boy was near death from midaortic syndrome — a rare but life-threatening condition marked by narrowing of the middle section of the aorta, the largest artery in the body. It had left him with severe hypertension, acute kidney injury and heart failure. As cardiologists worked to stabilize him, the surgical team weighed the options.

With diminished blood flow to the chest, abdomen and lower limbs, a significant number of people with untreated midaortic syndrome die from complications by age 40. The condition can be treated surgically, traditionally with a prosthetic graft made from synthetic material to perform an aortic bypass. But synthetic grafts can pose a number of challenges in children.

“Synthetic grafts don’t grow with the patient, which means that multiple surgeries may be necessary through the years to ensure appropriate graft size,” explains nephrologist Michael Ferguson, MD, who was a member of this patient’s care team. “Artificial grafts also carry a higher risk of thrombosis and infection.”

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