Stories about: multiple myeloma

From thalidomide to Pomalyst: Better living through chemistry

Thalidomide advertisement, c. 1961
Thalidomide advertisement, c. 1961

In times past, a pharmaceutical chemist’s main focus was to synthesize novel molecules to treat diseases. Today, an increasingly popular alternative is to re-engineer an existing drug—and continually improve it even after FDA approval. That’s how Robert D’Amato, MD, PhD, developed Pomalyst®, recently approved to treat multiple myeloma and the most potent analog to date of thalidomide.

Pomalyst_CelgeneCorpThalidomide has its own fascinating history. Originally developed by Chemie Grünenthal GmbH in the 1950s, it was the result of a search for an anti-anxiety drug to compete with Valium, and was approved for use in Europe as a sleep aid and depression treatment. Eventually, doctors found it useful for treating nausea, and started prescribing it off-label to pregnant women with morning sickness.

The results were disastrous. Thalidomide turned out to be a teratogen, causing severe birth defects. 

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