Stories about: Mustafa Sahin

Earlier treatment may help reverse autism-like behavior in tuberous sclerosis

research in Purkinje cells may help complete the puzzle of autism
(IMAGE: PETER TSAI)

New research on autism has found, in a mouse model, that drug treatment at a young age can reverse social impairments. But the same intervention was not effective at an older age.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Putting patients first in the translational research pipeline

During a follow-up visit, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.
During a follow-up visit at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

This is part II of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention. Read part I: Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine.

The hope to improve people’s lives is what drives many members of industry and academia to bring new products and therapies to market. At the BIO International Convention last week in Boston, there was lots of discussion about how translational science intersects with patients’ needs and why the best therapeutic developmental pipelines are consistently putting patients first.

As a case in point, Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s discussed his work to improve testing and translation of new therapies for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As a member of PACT (Preclinical Autism Consortium for Therapeutics) and director of Boston Children’s Translational Neuroscience Program, Sahin aims to bridge the gap between drug discovery and clinical translation.

“Our mission is to de-risk entry of new therapies in the ASD drug discovery and development space,” said Sahin, who is also a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.

One big challenge, says Sahin, is knowing how well — or how poorly — autism therapies are actually affecting people with ASD. Externally, ASD is recognized by its core symptoms of repetitive behaviors and social deficits.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Prescriptions for accelerating neuroscience translation: Q&A with Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD

Mustafa Sahin Translational Neuroscience CenterMustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, directs the Translational Neuroscience Center, which he founded several years ago to accelerate neuroscience research to the clinic. He also directs the hospital’s Translational Research Program. In this interview with Boston Children’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), Sahin talks about his motivations as a clinician-scientist and how he works with industry partners to move discoveries forward.

What drives you as a scientist? 

What drives me as a scientist has changed over the course of my career. It was my fascination with experimentation that first got me interested in biology. In high school, I took vials of fruit flies to a radiation oncology department and tested the effects of radiation on the mutation rate. When I came to the U.S. to study biochemistry in college, I was drawn to the mysteries of the brain. While my PhD and postdoctoral work continued on very fundamental questions about how neurons connect to each other, advances in genetics and neuroscience allowed me to bring rigorous basic science approaches to clinical questions. So more and more, my science is driven by a need to bring treatments to the patients I see in the clinic. Fortunately, this is no longer a long-term, aspirational goal, but something within reach in my career.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Lab-grown human cerebellar cells yield clues to autism

This Purkinje cell, made from a patient with tuberous sclerosis, will enable study of autism disorders. (Credit: Maria Sundberg)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasingly linked with dysfunction of the cerebellum, but the details, to date, have been murky. Now, a rare genetic syndrome known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is providing a glimpse.

TSC includes features of ASD in about half of all cases. Previous brain autopsies have shown that patients with TSC, as well as patients with ASD in general, have reduced numbers of Purkinje cells, the main type of neuron that communicates out of the cerebellum.

In a 2012 mouse study, team led by Mustafa Sahin, MD, at Boston Children’s Hospital, knocked out a TSC gene (Tsc1) in Purkinje cells. They found social deficits and repetitive behaviors in the mice, together with abnormalities in the cells.

The new study, published last week in Molecular Psychiatry, takes the research into human cells, for the first time creating cerebellar cells known as Purkinje cells from patients with TSC.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

From mice to humans: Genetic syndromes may be key to finding autism treatment

Boy and a mouse eye-to-eye
(Aliaksei Lasevich/stock.adobe.com)

A beautiful, happy little girl, Emma is the apple of her parents’ eyes and adored by her older sister. The only aspect of her day that is different from any other 6-month-old’s is the medicine she receives twice a day as part of a clinical trial for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

Emma’s mother was just 20 weeks pregnant when she first heard the words “tuberous sclerosis,” a rare genetic condition that causes tumors to grow in various organs of the body. Prenatal imaging showed multiple benign tumors in Emma’s heart.

Emma displays no symptoms of her disease, except for random “spikes” on her electroencephalogram (EEG) picked up by her doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital. The medication she is receiving is part of the Preventing Epilepsy Using Vigabatrin in Infants with TSC (PREVeNT) trial. Her mother desperately hopes it is the active antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin, rather than placebo.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Science Seen: Brain myelination in tuberous sclerosis complex

tuberous sclerosis brain myelination improved with CTGF deletion

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) strikes about 1 in 6,000 people and is marked by numerous benign tumors in the brain, kidneys, heart, lungs and other tissues. Children with TSC often have epilepsy, intellectual disability and/or autism, showing disorganized white matter in their brains. Work in the lab of Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, has shown that the TSC1 mutation disrupts the brain’s ability to adequately wrap its nerve fibers in myelin, the insulating coating that enhances nerves’ ability to conduct signals. A new study from the lab shows why: neurons lacking functional TSC1 secrete increased amounts of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). This impairs the development of oligodendrocytes, the cells that do the myelinating. Here, electron microscopy in a TSC mouse model shows a decreased number of nerve fibers wrapped in myelin (dark ovals) on the left. On the right, genetic deletion of CTGF increases myelination. Sahin plans to delve further to develop potential pharmaceutical approaches to restore myelination in TSC. Read more in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (Image: Ebru Ercan et al.)

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Impaired recycling of mitochondria in autism?

mitochondria in autism tuberous sclerosis

A study of tuberous sclerosis, a syndrome associated with autism, suggests a new treatment approach that could extend to other forms of autism.

The genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) causes autism in about half of the children affected. Because its genetics are well defined, TSC offers a window into the cellular and network-level perturbations in the brain that lead to autism. A study published today by Cell Reports cracks the window open further, in an intriguing new way. It documents a defect in a basic housekeeping system cells use to recycle and renew their mitochondria.

Mitochondria are the organelles responsible for energy production and metabolism in cells. As they age or get damaged, cells digest them through a process known as autophagy (“self-eating”), clearing the way for healthy replacements. (Just this month, research on autophagy earned the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.)

Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, MD, PhD, and Afshin Saffari, in Boston Children’s Hospital’s F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center now report that autophagy goes awry in brain cells affected by TSC. But they also found that two existing medications restored autophagy: the epilepsy drug carbamazepine and drugs known as mTOR inhibitors. The findings may hold relevance not just for TSC but possibly for other forms of autism and some other neurologic disorders.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment