Stories about: myelomeningocele

Could a simple injection fix spina bifida before birth?

spina bifida myelomeningocele
Prenatal cell therapy could avoid the need for invasive myelomeningocele surgery.

The neural tube, which becomes the spinal cord and brain, is supposed to close during the first month of prenatal development. In children with spina bifida, it doesn’t close completely, leaving the nerves of the spinal cord exposed and subject to damage. The most common and serious form of spina bifida, myelomeningocele, sets a child up for lifelong disability, causing complications such as hydrocephalus, leg paralysis, and loss of bladder and bowel control.

New research from Boston Children’s Hospital, though still in animal models, suggests that standard amniocentesis, followed by one or more injections of cells into the womb, could be enough to at least partially repair spina bifida prenatally.

Currently, the standard procedure is to operate on infants soon after delivery.

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