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Costly overuse of anti-nausea drug in children with gastroenteritis

Despite its increased use, ondansetron has not decreased IV rehydration.
Ondansetron has not decreased IV rehydration as originally intended.
Acute gastroenteritis is one of the leading causes of emergency department (ED) visits for children, accounting for more than 1.7 million trips each year. Its standard treatment has traditionally been rehydration by giving fluids orally or intravenously. Though both methods are equally effective, oral rehydration is preferred as it results in less discomfort and helps stop diarrhea sooner. The IV route is often employed in children who are vomiting and unable or unwilling to drink a large amount of liquids.

About a decade ago, ED physicians began orally administering the anti-nausea medication ondansetron to vomiting patients with gastroenteritis who were unable to hold down oral fluids. Once the ondansetron has stemmed their nausea, children have a much easier time with oral rehydration.

However, the lack of standardized use of this drug has led to its overuse. Though intended to reduce the use of IV rehydration, ondansetron proved so effective at reducing vomiting that its use skyrocketed in the course of just a few years.

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