Stories about: near-infrared spectroscopy

DIY pain relief with light-activated local nerve blocks

light-activated liposomes
Injected, gold-coated liposomes could release painkillers on demand when heated with NIR light. (Shutterstock)

You’ve just had a root canal or knee surgery — both situations that will likely require some sort of local pain medication. But instead of taking a systemic narcotic with all its side effects, what if you could medicate only the part of your body that hurts, only when needed and only as much as necessary?

That concept is today’s reality in the laboratory of Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and a senior associate in pediatric critical care at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The Kohane laboratory is developing a patient-triggered drug delivery system — but not a simple time-release mechanism or one tethered to ports or pumps. Instead, around the time of an intervention, pain medication would be injected into the site, or around a nerve leading to that site. Whenever pain relief is needed, the patient triggers release of the drug with a laser-like light-emitting device. “It’s like carrying the pharmacy in your body,” explains Kohane.

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Anticipating autism through functional neuroimaging

Mila-cap-ball-2014-05-08 12.24.14Is 9-month-old Mila Goshgarian at risk for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? Her 4-year-old twin brothers are both on the spectrum, so statistically her chances are at least 20 percent.

Her mother, Tonia, brought her into Boston Children’s Hospital for the Infant Sibling Project, which works with babies who are at increased risk of developing ASD in hopes of discovering early brain biomarkers for the disorder. This is Mila’s fifth visit; she’s been coming to the Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience for testing since the age of 3 months.

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