Stories about: neurodegenerative disorders

Forty years waiting for a cure: ALD gene therapy trial shows early promise

Ethan, who was diagnosed with ALD when he was 9, with his sister Emily
Ethan and me, June 1977

A small piece of notepaper, folded twice, sits tucked in a slot of the secretary desk in the living room. Every so often, I pull it out, read it, then reread.

Addressed to my mom, the paper has a question and two boxes, one “yes” and one “no,” written with the careful precision of a 7-year-old.

I am sad of Ethan. You too?

A check marks the box.

Yes. Yes, I am sad too.

Learning about adrenoleukodystrophy

My brother Ethan Williams was 9 years old in the fall of 1976, when he began to lose his sight. For my parents, that winter brought an endless round of doctor visits, therapists and lab tests.

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Neurologic clinical trials in a dish?

Neuron_in_tissue_culture
Neuron in tissue culture (Wikipedia creative commons)

Translational neuroscience research has seen a disappointing streak of failed clinical drug trials. While the need for therapeutics that target the nervous system is growing, recent results in diseases like Alzheimer’s and autism have disappointed, and many companies have begun to downsize their R&D investments. Prospects are glum for patients who need new therapies to help manage their disorders.

The frustration is that drug candidates that have shown promise in animal models have not demonstrated efficacy in humans. Mouse models are not proving to be sufficient surrogates for human neurologic disease. Human brains and brain cells are built and function differently, and many neurodevelopmental disorders—hard enough to diagnose in human children—don’t have identifiable behavioral counterparts in mice. As I hear over and over from scientists, there is no such thing as a mouse with autism.

A study, published in Cell Stem Cell this June and conducted by Clifford Woolf, MD, PhD, et al, is among the first to demonstrate the power of an alternative technique: modeling disease in neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells).

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