Stories about: neurons

New Human Neuron Core to analyze ‘disease in a dish’

Human Neuron CoreLast week was a good week for neuroscience. Boston Children’s Hospital received nearly $2.2 million from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC) to create a Human Neuron Core. The facility will allow researchers at Boston Children’s and beyond to study neurodevelopmental, psychiatric and neurological disorders directly in living, functioning neurons made from patients with these disorders.

“Nobody’s tried to make human neurons available in a core facility like this before,” says Robin Kleiman, PhD, Director of Preclinical Research for Boston Children’s Translational Neuroscience Center (TNC), who will oversee the Core along with neurologist and TNC director Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, and Clifford Woolf, PhD, of Boston Children’s F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center. “Neurons are really complicated, and there are many different subtypes. Coming up with standard operating procedures for making each type of neuron reproducibly is labor-intensive and expensive.”

Patient-derived neurons are ideal for modeling disease and for preclinical screening of potential drug candidates, including existing, FDA-approved drugs. Created from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made from a small skin sample, the lab-created human neurons capture disease physiology at the cellular level in a way that neurons from rats or mice cannot.

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Modeling pain in a dish: Nociceptors made from skin recreate pain physiology

Pain in a dish nociceptors

Chronic pain, affecting tens of millions of Americans alone, is debilitating and demoralizing. It has many causes, and in the worst cases, people become “hypersensitized”—their nervous systems fire off pain signals in response to very minor triggers.

There are no good medications to calm these signals, in part because the subjectivity of pain makes it difficult to study, and in part because there haven’t been good research models. Drugs have been tested in animal models and “off the shelf” cell lines, some of them engineered to carry target molecules (such as the ion channels that trigger pain signals). Drug candidates emerging from these studies initially looked promising but haven’t panned out in clinical testing.

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The 98%: Proteomics reveals proteins made from ‘noncoding’ DNA

proteins and peptides from noncoding DNA
Probing the genome's 'dark side' could change our view of biology.
Vast chunks of our DNA—fully 98 percent of our genome—are considered “non-coding,” meaning that they’re not thought to carry instructions to make proteins. Yet we already know that this “junk DNA” isn’t completely filler. For example, some sequences are known to code for bits of RNA that act as switches, turning genes on and off.

New research led by Judith Steen, PhD, and Gabriel Kreiman PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Proteomics Center and Neurobiology program, goes much further in mapping this “dark side” of the genome.

In a report published last month in Nature Communications, they describe a variety of proteins and peptides (smaller chains of amino acids) arising from presumed non-coding DNA sequences. Since they looked in just one type of cell—neurons—these molecules may only be the tip of a large, unexplored iceberg and could change our understanding of biology and disease.

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