Stories about: neuropathy

A skin cream for peripheral neuropathy? Small molecule may go a long way

The footpads of diabetic mice (line-D) treated with a cream containing XIB4035 have increased numbers of nerve terminals (shown in green in the lower right panel), whereas mice given a control cream (lower left) do not. The top two panels represent healthy “wild type” mice.
The footpads of diabetic mice given a cream containing XIB4035 (lower right) have new nerve terminals (shown in green), whereas mice given a control cream (lower left) do not. The top two panels represent healthy “wild type” mice.
About half of people with diabetes develop peripheral neuropathy. The most common form, small-fiber neuropathy, generally starts in the feet, causing pain, odd sensations like pricks and “pins and needles,” and—the most worrisome feature—a loss of sensation that can increase the chance of ulcers and infections.

In some cases, that may lead to the need for amputation—as happened with my diabetic great-grandfather whose numbed feet, unbeknownst to him, got too close to the fire.

While there are some treatments to reduce pain, there’s nothing that restores sensation. Nor do any existing treatments address the underlying cause of the neuropathy: the degeneration or dysfunction of the endings of the sensory neurons in the skin.

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