Stories about: newborn screening

BabySeq: Early results of newborn genomic sequencing are mixed

BabySeq
While a previous study indicated parents were very interested in newborn sequencing, just 7 percent of those approached have enrolled in BabySeq so far.

It seems like a great idea. We all have our genomes sequenced at birth, and any findings that suggest a future medical problem are addressed with early interventions, optimizing our health and extending our lives. But are parents of newborns ready to embrace the vision? Yes and no, according to interim results of a first-of-its-kind randomized trial of newborn sequencing. Findings from what’s known as the BabySeq Project were presented last week at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2016 Annual Meeting.

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DNA sequencing in newborns: Where do we go from here?

sequencing in newbornsCan sequencing of newborns’ genomes provide useful medical information beyond what current newborn screening already provides? What results are appropriate to report back to parents? What are the potential risks and harms? How should DNA sequencing information be integrated into patient care?

Four teams from across the country will converge this week (April 8–10) in Kansas City, Mo., to address these questions and share learnings from NIH-funded pilot projects. The four teams, comprising the NIH’s Newborn Sequencing In Genomic medicine and public HealTh (NSIGHT) project, will give updates on their work at the 6th Annual Pediatric Genomics Conference, hosted by Children’s Mercy Kansas City.

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Better diagnostic testing for newborns with galactosemia

Babies with galactosemia cannot properly break down the sugar galactose.

For babies born with galactosemia, the simple act of feeding can be deadly. In this rare inherited disease, infants are deficient in an enzyme known as GALT, leaving them unable to metabolize galactose, a sugary byproduct of lactose found in milk and other dairy foods. Instead, galactose builds up and wreaks havoc. If the condition isn’t caught at birth and treated with a lactose-free diet, infants can develop cataracts, brain swelling and organ failure and die within the first few weeks of life.

However, some babies do have enough enzyme to keep the levels of this sugar down, and have a much milder ”variant” form of the disease. The trouble is, the existing newborn screening test cannot always distinguish these children from those with the more severe form of the disease. 

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