Stories about: Nick Haining

CRISPR enables cancer immunotherapy drug discovery

Artwork depicting cancer cells with different genes deleted by CRISPR-Cas9, performed to identify novel cancer immunotherapy targets
These cancer cells (colored shapes) each have a different gene deleted through CRISPR-Cas9 technology. In a novel genetic screening approach, the T cells (red) destroy those cancer cells that have lost genes essential for evading immune attack, revealing potential drug targets for enhancing PD-1-checkpoint-based cancer immunotherapy. Credit: Haining Lab 

A novel screening method using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology has revealed new drug targets that could potentially enhance the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer immunotherapy.

The method, developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, uses CRISPR-Cas9 to systematically delete thousands of tumor genes to test their function in a mouse model. In findings published today by Nature, researchers led by pediatric oncologist W. Nick Haining, BM, BCh report that deletion of one gene, Ptpn2, made tumor cells more susceptible to PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors. Other novel drug targets are likely around the corner.

PD-1 inhibition “releases the brakes” on immune cells, enabling them to locate and destroy cancer cells. But for many patients, it’s not effective enough on its own.

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