Stories about: Niemann-Pick Type C

Can rare disease genes be protective?

Carriers of the rare disease Niemann-Pick C1 may be protected against Ebola.
Carriers of the rare disease Niemann-Pick C1 may be protected against Ebola.
First of several posts to commemorate (Feb 28, 2015).

Evolution is a strange thing: sometimes it favors keeping a mutation in the gene pool, even when a double dose of it is harmful—even fatal. Why? Because a single copy of that mutation is protective in certain situations.

A classic example is the sickle-cell mutation: People carrying a single copy don’t develop sickle cell disease, but they make enough sickled red blood cells to keep the malaria parasite from getting a toe-hold. (Certain other genetic disorders affecting red blood cells have a similar effect.)

Or consider cystic fibrosis. Carriers of mutations in the CFTR gene—some 1 in 25 people of European ancestry—appear to be protected from typhoid fever, cholera and possibly tuberculosis.

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Advancing clinical trials for Niemann-Pick type C: Sweet news for cyclodextrin

Febreze-Human Zoom-Creative CommonsOlaf Bodamer, MD, PhD, is associate chief of the Division of Genetics and Genomics at Boston Children’s Hospital and is launching a multidisciplinary clinic this spring for lysosomal storage diseases—including Niemann-Pick type C, sometimes referred to as “childhood Alzheimer’s.”

Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) has come a long way since its first description as an entity in the 1960s. Part of a group of rare metabolic disorders known as lysosomal storage diseases, NP-C leaves children unable to break down cholesterol and other lipid molecules. These molecules accumulate in the liver, spleen and brain, causing progressive neurologic deterioration.

I still vividly remember when I diagnosed my first patient with this devastating disease, a 3-year-old boy who had global developmental delay, restricted eye movement, loss of motor coordination and loss of speech. I spent hours with the family, explaining what was known about NP-C. When faced with the question about treatability and outcome, I could barely find the right words, but had to acknowledge that the outcome was inevitably fatal and that there was no specific treatment other than supportive measures to treat his symptoms.

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When n=2: A Mom’s foray into translational research

The twins' first cyclodextrin infusion bottles. Could this Febreze ingredient halt damage to their brains caused by Niemann-Pick Type C?

“Guess what just happened this afternoon?” It was late September, and Chris Hempel had just received an amazing communication from the Food and Drug Administration, and I got to be among the first to know. She’s not a doc, and not a researcher (in the usual sense), but a Mom out to save the lives and brain function of her identical twin girls. She is a force of nature powering a very small corner of translational research.

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