Stories about: nursing innovation

Preparing patients and families to manage ventricular assist devices

Beth Hawkins ventricular assist devices

Children in severe heart failure sometimes have a ventricular assist device (VAD) implanted in their chest. VADs are electrically-powered heart pumps that can tide children over while they wait for a heart transplant. They can also be implanted long term if a child is ineligible for transplant, or simply buy children time to recover their own heart function.

Because problems with VADs can be life-threatening, families need extensive training in managing the device and its external controller at home. Nurse practitioner Beth Hawkins RN, MSN, FNP-C, and her colleagues in the Boston Children’s VAD Program begin the training at the child’s hospital bedside while they are still in the cardiac ICU. But despite lectures, demos and practice opportunities, the prospect of maintaining a VAD remains terrifying for many parents and children.

“A lot of families feel their child is attached to a ticking time bomb that could go off at any time,” says Hawkins. “Many say taking a child home on a VAD feels like having a newborn baby again.”

Hawkins realized that families needed more support.

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Red Zone at Home: Quality and safety beyond the hospital walls

taking meds at home 3 _shutterstock_141046318

In an age where mobile apps, big data and sophisticated technology seem to dominate every conversation about health care innovation, Jamie Harris’s quality improvement project might not seem so revolutionary. But Harris, a nurse in the cardiac electrophysiology program at Boston Children’s Hospital, saw an opportunity to take an existing patient safety initiative and use it in a new way.

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Hacking our way to vaccine compliance: The birth of WhatVax

Gomez's team at work on a platform for vaccine tracking and orderingEva Gómez, RN-BC, MSN, CPN, is a staff development specialist in Clinical Education and Informatics 
at Boston Children’s Hospital. She and Tami Chase, RN, nurse manager at Martha Eliot Health Center, received the Springboard Prize from Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program at last month’s Hacking Pediatrics.

For months, my colleague Tami Chase and I had been experiencing a big pain point in our patient-care process: the complicated and time-consuming task of ordering vaccines—a task that requires providers and nurses to memorize or figure out complex algorithms based on variables like patient age, ethnicity and medical/family history. There are many vaccines and formulations, and if vaccine supplies are used incorrectly, we are less able to order free vaccines from federal and state sources. We’re then forced to purchase vaccines privately—tapping hospital funds that could be used for many other worthy projects.

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