Stories about: nutrition

Three child-focused products to compete at Boston Children’s Hospital Innovation Tank

The creators of a powered arm brace, a device to aid newborn resuscitation and a platform for virtual nutritional consults have been chosen to present at Boston Children’s Hospital’s second annual pitch competition—otherwise known as the Innovation Tank—during the hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015.

Augmented Infant Resuscitator Myomo Kindrdfood

Presented by the health care company Philips, the November 9 competition will be hosted by Troy Carter, founder and CEO of the entertainment company Atom Factory (managing Lady Gaga, among others) and newly named guest shark on ABC’s Shark Tank.

A la Shark Tank, each team will pitch its health care innovation to a panel of venture capitalists, clinicians and industry leaders, who will decide how to award $30,000 in sponsored prize money and offer advice on how to advance projects to market.

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Got vitamin D? Study finds low levels in critically ill children

The sun helps us get some of the vitamin D we need, but not enough of it. A new study finds that critically ill kids are more than twice as likely as kids generally to be vitamin D deficient. (nichole ★/Flickr)

When a child is admitted to a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), probably one of the last things on anyone’s mind is, “Are they getting enough vitamin D?”

But this question could be a very important one, according to Kate Madden, MD, and Adrienne Randolph, MD, critical care medicine specialists at Boston Children’s Hospital. In a study of children admitted to Boston Children’s ICU, they found that those with very low vitamin D levels—below what the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) considers deficient—tended to have more severe illness.

So what’s so important about vitamin D? Turns out, a lot more than most people think.

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More accolades for omega 3’s

Omega-3’s are emerging superheroes in the nutrition world. Over two decades ago, scientists noticed that Greenland Eskimos had very low rates of coronary heart disease compared to Western populations. Their secret, it turned out, was eating fish—particularly, fatty fishes like salmon that contain a lot of omega-3 fatty acids.

An avalanche of studies have since demonstrated the cardiovascular health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, also found in flax seeds and walnuts, as well as suggesting benefits in combating depression, rheumatoid arthritis and some types of cancer, and in boosting cognitive function.

And now comes more evidence that they can prevent blindness.

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