Stories about: openpediatrics

Digital health, innovation and partnerships: A Q&A with Boston Children’s Chief Innovation Officer

Brownstein
Brownstein

During the last decade or so, health care has been rapidly transforming from a reactive, paper-based system to a responsive digital model.

Massachusetts, under Gov. Charlie Baker’s leadership, has launched a comprehensive public-private partnership to accelerate the state’s digital health care sector. The partnership has identified multiple ways to drive investment and growth in the state.

Technology transfer from universities to private companies is just one example. In the past, each transfer required completely new agreements. Three new standardized templates for licensing, technology transfer and sponsored research will help facilitate these processes. In 2016, the partnership will expand its Mentorship Speakers Series with a stronger focus on digital health care. Finally, the Digital Healthcare Innovation Hub and Accelerator will provide a space to support and grow new digital health companies in Boston.

Vector visited with John Brownstein, PhD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Chief Innovation Officer, to better understand the background and potential impact of this new initiative.

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IBM’s Watson at work: Transforming health care

Part of a continuing series of videotaped sessions at Boston Children’s Hospital’s recent Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.

What’s IBM’s Watson been up to since winning Jeopardy? Among other things, it’s been trying to help doctors make decisions. “We live in an age of information overload,” says Mike Rhodin, Senior Vice President of the IBM Watson Group. “The challenge is to now turn that information into knowledge.”

Interestingly, most of the inquiries Rhodin received post-Jeopardy were from doctors, who were interested in the way Watson sorted and ranked possible answers. Here, Rhodin and Dan Cerutti, VP of Watson Commercialization, outline IBM’s vision to improve global health care through a technology platform called CarePlex:

Stay tuned as we post more sessions from the Pediatric Innovation Summit (also available on YouTube) and read our blog coverage.

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OPENPediatrics: A blueprint for big innovation

My father had a favorite bit of advice as we embarked on our adult lives: “Go big or go home.” Going big is exactly what OPENPediatrics is doing, empowering physicians and nurses to care for children across the globe.

The Web-based digital learning platform was conceived 10 years ago by Jeffrey Burns, MD, MPH, chief of critical care at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Traci Wolbrink, MD, MPH, an associate in critical care. It concluded a year-long beta test in April 2014, and version 1 has now been launched.

Developed to impart critical care skills, OPENPediatrics uses lectures, simulators and protocols to deliver training. In the process, it has helped save lives.

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“See one, do one, teach one” goes global

[Ed. note: Tune in to the livestream Monday at 9:30 a.m. ET]

Can the inventors of Watson help save sick children in the developing world? A “cloud-based” pediatric learning module, conceived by Children’s Hospital Boston and built by IBM Interactive, is being beta-tested this year in 20 countries. Provisionally called OpenPediatrics, it will give 1,000 doctors and nurses on five continents the next best thing to hands-on training. (Above is just a preview).

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Removing global bottlenecks in medical training

This post, final of a three-part series, is adapted from a talk by Jeffrey P. Burns, MD, MPH, Chief of the Division of Critical Care Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, at the IBM Impact 2011 Global Conference. (See posts one and two.)

We have a healthcare gap in the United States and around the globe: There aren’t enough doctors and nurses trained in how to take care of a critically ill child. Children are not little adults; you can’t just cut the doses.

So we need a solution. But the solution that we need in a resource-limited environment is not the same solution that we need in a resource-advantaged environment. We need to find a platform that addresses the needs of both.

Several years ago, one of my colleagues, Traci Wolbrink, went to a camp in sub-Saharan Africa,

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“Dosing” medical knowledge: Beyond passive learning

Jeffrey P. Burns, MD, MPH, is Chief of the Division of Critical Care Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston. He established and is Executive Director of the Children’s Hospital Simulator Program, one of the first hospital-based pediatric simulator programs in the U.S., and also co-chairs the hospital’s Ethics Committee. This post, second of three parts, is adapted from his recent talk at the IBM Impact 2011 Global Conference.


“Practice makes perfect” is an axiom that holds for most tasks, including providing health care to a critically ill patient.  And yet even if I’m in training for several years, the experiences I get and the experiences the person next to me gets are radically different – in fact, they’re very random.  I’m on one night, you’re on the next night, and what I saw last night, you won’t see tonight.

That’s no way to dose and sequence knowledge; in fact, no one would set up an educational program where you learned randomly.  There’s a troublesome paradox: Medical crises are relatively rare events in children, as compared with adults, and thus there are fewer physicians and nurses with the necessary experience in caring for critically ill children.

Every month, I get letters from all over the world – “Dr. Burns, can I observe in your ICU?” Last month, we’ve had somebody from Iran, Pakistan and Turkey. And yet we often must say “no,” because the walls are only so big. How can we best spread our knowledge and expertise?

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Can web-based technology save critically ill children?

(This post, the first of three, is adapted from a talk Jeffrey Burns, MD, MPH, gave at IBM’s Impact 2011 Global Conference in April. For the full talk, jump to 44:37 in this video.)

Right now, valuable information is bottlenecked in an old paradigm. Expert training on how to treat children with life-threatening illnesses is available at relatively few hospitals across the world, and access to this training remains anchored to an apprenticeship model – see one, do one, teach one – that’s now nearly 100 years old.

We need to change that paradigm.

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