Stories about: organ engineering

Organs-on-chips reveal breathing’s critical role in lung cancer development

Image of lung cancer cells grown alongside human lung small airway cells inside an organ-on-a-chip
Inside view of a lung cancer chip: Lung adenocarcinoma cells are grown as a tumor cell colony (blue) next to normal human lung small airway cells (purple). Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

One of the biggest challenges facing cancer researchers — and lots of other medical researchers, in fact — is that experimental models cannot perfectly replicate human diseases in the laboratory.

That’s why human Organs-on-Chips, small devices that mimic human organ environments in an affordable and lifelike manner, have quickly been taken up into use by scientists in academic and industry labs and are being tested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Now, the chips have helped discover an important link between breathing mechanics and lung cancer behavior.

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The whole tooth: Mechanics may aid in building organs

(Wikimedia Commons)

How do cells figure out how to build three-dimensional organs with multiple kinds of tissues? A group of engineers, geneticists, biochemists and cell biologists at Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering sunk their teeth into this mystery – starting, in fact, with the tooth.

Scientists have known for more than a century that the growth of many organs (including tooth, cartilage, bone, muscle, tendon, kidney and lung) begins with the formation of a compact cell mass called “condensed mesenchyme.” But what makes this mass form to begin with? Until now, no one knew.

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