Stories about: patient experience

Designing from the bottom up: Guiding healthcare stakeholders through ideation

healthcare co-design

At a recent event, Michelle Domey, mother of a child with special health care needs, found herself sharing her experience with a design expert, describing recent telehealth appointments at Boston Children’s Hospital. “My son feels like he’s having a private appointment, even though I’m sitting next to him, and his doctor is miles away,” she reflected. “Who thought that was possible through a tablet or a computer?”

As adult patients nodded in agreement, the group began to think about how to leverage Michelle’s experience to design support systems for kids with special health care needs. A software engineer expanded Michelle’s comment into a vision of the classroom of the future — a learning environment fully equipped with remote learning solutions for children with special health care needs, and environmental sensors for children with severe food allergies and health risks. The Olin College Co-Design for Better Health Innovation Lab was well underway.

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Are tweets a good measure of patient experience and health care quality?

Twitter speech bubblesWhen it comes to gauging quality, we often turn to Twitter, Yelp, Angie’s List and other networks for instant feedback on pretty much any company, contractor or store we do business with.

In contrast, hospitals often rely on tools like the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (HCAHPS) survey, which gives voice to patients and their concerns about the care they receive. But a new study published in the journal BMJ Quality & Safety suggests social media have something to add to that.

Notes_title_for_overlay“The main problems with measuring patient experience by survey are the small numbers of people who respond to surveys and the lag time,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program (CHIP). “It can take up to two years before survey data are released to the public. Given that social media data are close to real time, we wanted to see if we could capture this discussion and if the content is useful.”

Hawkins, with Boston Children’s chief innovation officer, John Brownstein, PhD, and their colleagues collected more than 400,000 public tweets directed at the Twitter handles of nearly 2,400 U.S. hospitals between 2012 and 2013. Using machine learning, natural language processing and manual curation, they tagged 34,735 patient experience tweets directed at 1,726 hospital-owned Twitter accounts.

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15 health care predictions for 2015

healthcare predictions
2014 continued to see massive evolution in health care—from digital health innovations to the maturation of technologies in genomics, genome editing and regenerative medicine to the configuration of the health care system itself. We asked leaders from the clinical, research and business corners of Boston Children’s Hospital to weigh in with their forecasts for 2015. Click “Full story” for them all, or jump to:
The consumer movement in health care
Evolving care models
Genomics in medicine
Stem cell therapeutics
Therapeutic development
New technology
Biomedical research

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Hacking pediatrics: Improving the patient experience

kids hacking-shutterstock_58262788Michael Docktor, MD, is director of Clinical Mobile Solutions at Boston Children’s Hospital and a pediatric gastroenterologist with a research and clinical interest in inflammatory bowel disease. (See a recent interview with him on MedTech Boston.)

How do the most disruptive companies of our day like Facebook and Pinterest get started? In the warm glow of Silicon Valley, in the shadows of technology titans such as Apple and Google, bright, enthusiastic young entrepreneurs, programmers and designers get together to “hack” ideas for the next big thing. The concept is simple and has worked in tackling challenges from creating the next great social network to developing an innovative green-energy technology.

However, applying this model of collaborative, rapid problem-solving to pain points in health care is still a relatively novel concept. Hacking Medicine, a community of passionate “hackers” at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has brought this practice to medicine and successfully organized events from Uganda to Boston. Graduates of one recent event with AthenaHealth—which develops and sells cloud-based services for electronic health records, practice management and care coordination—are on their way to developing successful businesses, including PillPack (helping patients manage their medications), the BeTH Project (inexpensive adjustable prostheses) and Podimetrics (a data-transmitting shoe insole for diabetics).

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