Stories about: Peter Weinstock

Training neurosurgeons in a rare hydrocephalus procedure, with a little help from Hollywood

ETV trainer

A 4-year-old has a progressively enlarging head and loss of developmental milestones: a clear case of hydrocephalus. He undergoes a minimally invasive endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) to drain off the trapped cerebrospinal fluid.

This requires puncturing the floor of the brain’s third ventricle (fluid-filled cavity) with an endoscope — while avoiding a lethal tear in the basilar artery, which lies perilously close.

There are no good neurosurgical training models for this rare and scary operation.

“We semi-blindly poke a hole through the ventricle floor,” says Benjamin Warf, MD, director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. “To make the technique safer and to be able to train more people, it would be very helpful to make that hole in a way that’s less anxiety-provoking.”

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Medicine meets theater: Pediatrics training, parent practice, device innovation ‘on location’

medical simulation

Pediatric medicine just took a step for the better in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area with a new, expanded pediatric Simulation (SIM) Center — a dedicated space where doctors, nurses and other staff can rehearse tough medical situations or practice tricky or rare procedures in a clinical setting that looks and feels real.

But clinicians aren’t the only ones who will be using the new 4,000-square-foot facility, which incorporates real medical equipment, set design and special effects.

Families can get hands-on practice with medical equipment they’ll be using at home. Inventors and “hackers” can develop and test new devices or software platforms and see how they perform in a life-like clinical environment. Planned hacks, for example, will explore different medical and surgical applications for voice-activated and gesture-controlled devices.

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Making rare operations common through special effects simulation

What if I told you that there was a new technology that improved outcomes for patients of all ages, reduced pain and suffering, reduced time in the operating room, reduced anesthetic times and, the more you did it, the better it benefited patients. And here’s the kicker — it has no side effects. And it’s available everywhere care is delivered.”

That’s what critical care physician Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD, described at his recent TEDx talk in the Boston suburb of Natick.

Weinstock is director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Simulator Program, SIMPeds. The technology is ultra-high-fidelity medical simulation coupled with a simple concept: practicing before game time.

I mean really practicing.

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From napkin sketch to new product: Rapid prototyping service speeds medical device development

rapid 3D prototyping services at hospitals
These custom devices hold fiber optic probes used to measure blood oxygenation in newborns. (Courtesy Noah Schulz, SIMPeds)

Some people bring data and completed designs. Others just bring simple sketches. “We have this idea for this device,” they begin. “It may only help 15 kids a year, but it could really improve their quality of life.”

Other people bring only a clinical need: “We need something to keep babies lying still after their procedure, without having to medicate them.”

To make these ideas more tangible and help launch them down a formal development path, the Boston Children’s Hospital Simulator Program, SIMPeds, has begun making its 3D printing and engineering service available to help hospital staff rapidly prototype new devices.

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Hold me, turn me: 3D printed models help doctors rehearse tricky cerebrovascular procedures

Vein of Galen-3D-20140418_Orbach-croppedFour children with life-threatening malformations of blood vessels in the brain appear to be the first to benefit from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk corrective procedures.

The children, ranging from 2 months to 16 years old, all posed particular treatment challenges: cerebrovascular disease often entails complex tangles of vessels in sensitive brain areas.

“These children had unique anatomy with deep vessels that were very tricky to operate on,” says Boston Children’s neurosurgeon Edward Smith, MD, senior author of the paper and co-director of the hospital’s Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center. “The 3D-printed models allowed us to rehearse the cases beforehand and reduce operative risk as much as we could. You can physically hold the 3D models, view them from different angles, practice the operation with real instruments and get tactile feedback.”

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