Stories about: plastic surgery

3D printing helps doctors plan a toddler’s craniofacial surgery

Plastic surgeon John Meara, MD, and neurosurgeon Mark Proctor, MD, in the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at Boston Children’s Hospital are early adopters of 3D printing technology. They put it to good use in caring for Violet, a buoyant toddler who was diagnosed before birth with a rare, complicated skull and facial defect. Using CT images, and with the help of the hospital’s Simulator Program, they were able to build a series of plastic 3D models of Violet’s skull and rehearse her surgery—months before Violet arrived from Oregon.

“I actually feel like I know her, because I’ve seen that model change and grow over the last several months,” said Meara just before the surgery. “We can see and feel the trajectory of where we will have to make certain cuts, and that’s never been possible before.”

Read more on 3D printing in medicine in the Boston Globe. Follow Violet’s journey in this four-part series, and in The New York Times.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Along with “fixing” cleft lip comes correcting misperceptions about its causes

OP-Smile-IThroughout the world, a child is born with a cleft lip or palate nearly every three minutes. In resource-poor areas, many of these children die before their first birthday, and those who survive have difficulty eating, speaking and being accepted by their peers.

Lauren Mednick, PhD, a pediatric psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, knows this all too well. As a child life specialist with Operation Smile, she was part of a medical missionary team that traveled the world providing safe, effective reconstructive surgery and treatment to children with clefts and other facial deformities.

Working closely with these children and their families, Mednick was amazed at how many of them blamed the child’s condition on themselves, the supernatural or a combination of the two. She listened as a mother in Morocco “confessed” that her baby had been born with a cleft lip, because she looked at an animal with a cloven hoof during her pregnancy. She sat with a Haitian woman who attributed her child’s cleft lip to an afternoon when she spent too long looking at a child in her village with a facial deformity.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

A phat cell-based technology for plastic surgery

A patient's own cells may be able to create fat tissue with its own blood supply. (Image: Jagiellonian University Medical College)

The majority of the millions of plastic surgeries performed in the U.S. each year aren’t cosmetic procedures for Hollywood starlets or Beverly Hills housewives trying to hold on to their youthful looks. They’re reconstructive operations for patients with disfiguring injuries, tumor resections and congenital defects such as childhood hemangiomas, which can occur on the face.

A big challenge in reconstruction is compensating for the loss of a large volume of subcutaneous fat. Currently, there are three ways to do this, none of them ideal.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment