Stories about: preclinical research

News Note: Modeling sepsis better to find a cure faster

In this SEM image, E. coli (green) bacteria, a common instigator of sepsis, is captured by bioengineered magnetic beads.
New assessment criteria for monitoring sepsis in pig models could help clinical researchers more accurately evaluate potential sepsis treatments in preclinical experiments. In this SEM image, E. coli (green) bacteria, a common instigator of sepsis, is captured by bioengineered magnetic beads. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Sepsis, or blood poisoning, occurs when the body’s response to infection damages its own tissues, leading to organ failure. It is the most common cause of death in people who have been hospitalized, yet no new therapies have been developed in the last 30 years. Many treatments that have prevented death in animal experiments have failed in clinical trials, indicating that a more clinically-relevant sepsis model is needed for therapeutic development.

To bridge this gap, a team of scientists from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital think a better experimental model of sepsis in pigs could help weed out the therapies most likely to succeed in humans. Their method, a scoring criteria to evaluate sepsis in pigs that closely mirrors standard human clinical assessment, is reported in Advances in Critical Care Medicine.

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When preclinical studies get dosing wrong, new drugs get lost in translation

Robin Kleiman, PhD, is Director of Preclinical Research at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Translational Neuroscience Center.

drug dosing preclinical studies

Basic research investigators are increasingly conducting translational research studies to advance their therapeutic approaches to clinical trials. Unfortunately, when testing drugs in rodent models of human disease, these studies often do not measure drug levels from their animal subjects to determine drug dosing.

This is understandable, since collecting these data can be very expensive and requires specialized expertise. But as a consequence, a lot of preclinical literature is published without any consideration of what drug concentration was actually achieved in the organ of interest. This is undercutting our efforts to get new therapies to patients.

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A calmer rodent is a better rodent for pain medication research

The global market for pain medications is huge — some estimates predict it will hit $41.6 billion by 2017. However, the costs of pain medicine development are huge, too; it takes roughly $900 million to bring a new analgesic compound to market. In part, this is because some 80 percent of compounds that look promising in preclinical animal studies (largely in rodents) fail in late-stage clinical trials.

David Roberson, MBA, a neuroscience graduate student in the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, wants to make those preclinical studies better at predicting whether a new compound will work safely in people — by studying rodents at “home.”

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