Stories about: precocious puberty

Dads to blame? Genetic research reveals cause for precocious puberty

Whole-exome sequencing reveals a gene mutation that comes into play only if inherited from the father.
Whole-exome sequencing reveals a gene mutation that comes into play only if inherited from the father.

For a small subset of boys and girls who undergo early puberty, there’s now a specific explanation. New genetic research, involving whole-exome sequencing, has identified four novel heterozygous mutations in a gene known as MKRN3. Interestingly, while precocious puberty is more common in girls, all 15 affected children in the study inherited the mutations from their fathers.

Precocious puberty—the development of secondary sexual characteristics before 8 years in girls and 9 years in boys—has been associated with short stature, long-term health risks and an increase in conduct and behavioral disorders during adolescence. Physiologically, there are two types: central and peripheral. Central, the more common form, occurs when the pituitary gland, which controls puberty development, is activated too early.

“While a great deal of genetic studies have focused on the overall genetic contribution to pubertal timing, far less research has been conducted to find specific genetic causes of central precocious puberty,” says Andrew Dauber, MD, MMSc, of the Division of Endocrinology at Boston Children’s Hospital, who co-authored the study, published online this week by The New England Journal of Medicine.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment