Stories about: pregnancy

Maternal-infant health research will bring placenta into view

placental health
A pre-1858 schematic of the placental circulation from Gray’s Anatomy (Wikimedia Commons).

The afterbirth has generally been an afterthought, but that’s about to change.

This week, 19 research centers were awarded grants from NIH’s Human Placenta Project, which is seeking to learn more about the intricate organ that sustained us in the womb, the interface between us and our mothers.

A robust placenta is key to a healthy pregnancy and baby, but strangely, not much is actually known about it. “It’s a fascinating but very poorly understood structure,” says P. Ellen Grant, MD, who directs the Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and is leading one of the projects.

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Predicting the probability of a tragedy: A model for teratogenicity

Congenital malformation of the feet caused by thalidomide.

The question comes up when a pregnant woman has a serious medical condition: should she or shouldn’t she be treated? Are the indicated drugs safe for the baby?

Drugs are assigned pregnancy risk classes. Thalidomide, whose reputation for causing fetal malformations was chillingly established in the 1960s, is solidly in Class X (the most risky), as are the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin and the anti-coagulant warfarin. At the other extreme are Class A drugs that are widely recognized as safe in pregnancy.

But between these extremes is a huge group of drugs for which little is known.

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