Stories about: premature babies

“Omics” study takes a comprehensive look at premature birth

Seven layers of omics study
Seven layers of “omics” included in the PREM-MAP study

Every year, one in 10 new babies in the United States is born preterm, or before 37 weeks of gestation. With the last few weeks of pregnancy crucial to proper development of the lungs and brain, prematurely born infants can suffer lifelong problems.

Now scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have launched a comprehensive study to understand the reasons and risk factors for premature births. Earlier this year, Olaf Bodamer, MD, PhD was awarded a grant for this work from uBiome, a microbial genomics company.

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Caffeine helps premature babies breathe a little easier…but how much and for how long?

Cup of coffee caffeine helps premature babies breatheThe caffeine in coffee might help get you going in the morning, but for premature babies it can be lifesaving. For more than a decade neonatologists have routinely given premature newborns caffeine as a respiratory stimulant, helping their immature lungs and brains remember to breathe and reducing episodes of intermittent hypoxia (IH)—short, repetitive drops in blood oxygen levels.

Typically, babies are weaned off caffeine once they’re developmentally mature enough to breathe normally without help, usually around 34 weeks’ gestational age. “It’s at about that age that most babies stop having clinically obvious hypoxic spells,” explains Boston Children’s Hospital pulmonologist and neonatologist Lawrence Rhein, MD. “But the question has been, are there continued but less obvious episodes that we could and should be preventing? And can caffeine play a role in doing so?”

It’s an important question to ask. While no single IH episode has much effect, lack of oxygen over days or weeks can affect a baby’s lungs, brain and heart, and fuel inflammation within her tissues and organs—all of which can have long-term developmental impact.

Rhein and colleagues from 15 other hospitals across the U.S.—together comprising the Caffeine Pilot Study Group—came together to probe the question. Their answer: pour the baby another cup.

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It’s not the stem cells but what’s inside them that matters for babies with lung disease

The molecular equivalent of a message in a bottle could open up the possibility of stem cell-based therapies for newborn lung disease — but without the cells. (aturkus/Flickr)

Three years ago, Stella Kourembanas, MD, and S. Alex Mitsialis, PhD, thought they had a major breakthrough in treating pulmonary hypertension (PH) — dangerously high blood pressure in the pulmonary artery (the vessel that carries blood from the heart to the lungs) — and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) — a chronic lung disease that can affect babies born prematurely or who were put on a ventilator.

The two diseases are complex and serious, often occur together and are currently incurable.

The solution for PH and BPD, the two researchers from Boston Children’s Division of Newborn Medicine thought, was to protect the babies’ fragile lungs with a kind of stem cell called mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs), which can develop into lung tissue.

Their preclinical studies were pretty conclusive. If they transplanted MSCs in mouse models of BPD and PH, the mice didn’t develop the lung inflammation that triggers the disease.

But the results were a little confusing.

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