Stories about: profiles

My work, my life: John Brownstein, PhD

Boston Children’s Hospital’s new chief innovation officer, John Brownstein, PhD, is an epidemiologist by training and a founding father of the growing field of digital epidemiology—the use of digital (especially social and mobile) data from a variety of sources to detect and track disease and promote health. As co-founder of HealthMap and director of the Computational Epidemiology Group in the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program, he infuses his work into many aspects of his life—along with a healthy helping of hot sauce.

Hover over the icons in the photo below to learn about the things in Brownstein’s phone, office and life that keep him going.

Brownstein will be one of four panelists discussing Patient Engagement in a Big Data World at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Learn more about the summit and register to attend.

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Sun Hur, PhD: Overcoming barriers to reveal innate immunity’s secrets

Self-discovery is a theme that unites Sun Hur’s life and work. Growing up with a passion for physics, Hur pursued a scientific career in chemistry before launching her own research group in biology. Today, Hur, an investigator in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM), uses her considerable intellectual gifts to uncover how the immune system distinguishes self from non-self.

In the video above, produced by the Vilcek Foundation (which honors and supports foreign-born scientists and artists who have made outstanding contributions to society in the United States), Hur talks about her personal and scientific journey since coming to the U.S. from her native South Korea in 2000. Overcoming cultural and language barriers, she has turned her childhood fascination with order and chaos toward exploring how the innate immune system recognizes invaders, in particular disease-causing viruses that generate a double-stranded RNA during replication.

These studies, which could open doors to new treatments for cancer and inflammatory diseases, recently garnered her the Vilcek’s 2015 Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science.

Adapted from announcements originally published by the Vilcek Foundation and the PCMM.

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My work, my life: Michael J. Docktor, MD

Michael J. Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of Innovation and director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, is also a practicing gastroenterologist, a proud father of two and a passionate mobile-and-digital health trailblazer. An original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics, Docktor’s goal is to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship, consumer technology, design and clinical pain points.

Hover over the images and icons in the photo below to learn more about Docktor’s professional and personal life, favorite gadgets and more.

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Realities of relativity nudge researcher to alternate career plan

From a series profiling researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital

He’s a big thinker focused on harnessing the hyper-small. Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, is a leading drug delivery and biomaterials researcher, leveraging nanoparticle technology and other new vehicles to make medications safer and more effective.

It’s not quite what he had in mind as a child. He dreamed of studying life forms in remote galaxies.

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But when he became aware of the constraints of relativity, he re-focused his ambitions, ultimately concentrating on innovations in drug delivery. Here’s what he told us.

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Ophthalmologist finds another way to be a rock star

From a series on researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital.David Hunter, MD, PhD

David G. Hunter, MD, PhD, dreamed of a career as a rock star. Instead, he became Boston Children’s Hospital’s ophthalmologist-in-chief and invented the Pediatric Vision Scanner. The device, designed for use by pediatricians, detects amblyopia or “lazy eye,” the leading cause of vision loss in children, as early as preschool age when the condition is highly correctable.

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ACLs, tricorders and the microwave: A surgeon’s passions

This post is first in a series of profiles of researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Martha Murray, Braden Fleming and their children in San Francisco.
Martha Murray, Braden Fleming and their children in San Francisco.

“I’d like to meet the innovator who made the tricorder that Bones used on Star Trek,” says orthopedic surgeon Martha Murray, MD. “A push of the button and things healed, no muss, no fuss. I’d like to know how he or she made that work because I could really use one.”

Murray has been on a 30-year quest to devise a better way to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. She recently crossed a major milestone: The Food and Drug Administration approved a first-in-human safety trial of a bio-enhanced ACL repair that encourages the ligament to heal itself. Murray expects the first patients to enroll in the 20-patient trial by early 2015. We had a few questions for her.

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Neuronal migration and a well-configured cortex: A neuroscientist looks back

Normal brain and Double Cortex-Courtesy Christopher Walsh(Above: In double cortex syndrome, causing epilepsy and mental retardation, an extra cortex forms just beneath the cerebral cortex [right]. The causative DCX mutation interferes with migration of neurons during the cortex’s early development. Courtesy Walsh Lab)

The journal Neuron, celebrating its 25th anniversary, recently picked one influential neuroscience paper from each year of the publication. In this two-part series, we feature the two Boston Children’s Hospital’s scientists who made the cut. The Q&A below is adapted with kind permission from Cell Press. (See part 1)

Key to well-tuned brain function is the migration of neurons to precise locations as the brain develops. The long journey begins deep inside the brain and ends in the outer cerebral cortex—where our highest cognitive functions lie. Christopher Walsh, MD, PhD, has shown that several genetic mutations causing neurodevelopmental disorders disrupt this neuronal migration, landing neurons in the wrong places. Each gene governs a specific sub-task: one kicks off the migration process; others stop migration when neurons have arrived in the right location.

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Microglia’s role in brain development: A neuroscientist looks back

The journal Neuron, celebrating its 25th anniversary, recently picked one influential neuroscience paper from each year of the publication. In this two-part series, we feature the two Boston Children’s Hospital’s scientists who made the cut. The Q&A below is adapted with kind permission from Cell Press.

Microglial cell with synapses
CAUGHT IN THE ACT: This microglial cell is from the lateral geniculate nucleus, which receives visual input from the eyes. The red and blue are synapses that it has engulfed. (Blue synapses represent inputs from the same-side eye; red, the opposite-side eye.)

In 2012, Beth Stevens, PhD, and colleagues provided a new understanding of how glial cells shape healthy brain development. Glia were once thought to be merely nerve “glue” (the meaning of “glia” from the Greek), serving only to protect and support neurons. “In the field of neuroscience, glia have often been ignored,” Stevens told Vector last year.

No longer. Stevens’s 2012 paper documented that microglia—glial cells best known for their immune function—are no passive bystanders. They get rid of excess connections, or synapses, in the developing brain the same way they’d dispatch an invading pathogen—by eating them.

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