Stories about: proteins

Protein science 2.0: Amping up antibodies

Institute for Protein Innovation antibody libraries
The Institute for Protein Innovation, launching next week with $15 million in grants and philanthropy, aims to develop comprehensive, open-source libraries of antibodies targeting human proteins.

It began with the proteins. Before Watson and Crick unraveled DNA’s double helix in the 1950s, biochemists snipped, ground and pulverized animal tissues to extract and study proteins, the workhorses of the body.

Then, in 1990, the Human Genome Project launched. It promised to uncover the underpinnings of all human biology and the keys to treating disease. Funding for DNA and RNA tools and studies skyrocketed. Meanwhile, protein science fell behind.

While genomics unveiled a wealth of information, including the identity of genes that lead to disease when mutated, researchers still do not fully understand what all the genes really do and how mutations change their function and cause disease.

Now proteins are promising to provide the missing link.

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Biomarkers for all

Just about any measurable molecule that changes with health and disease could be a biomarker. (David Guo's Master/Flickr)

Your doctor has a lot of tools to detect, diagnose and monitor disease: x-rays, MRIs, angiography, blood tests, biopsies…the list goes on.

What would be great would be the ability to test for disease in a way where there’s no or low pain (not invasive) and lots of gain (actionable data about the disease process itself, its progression and the success of treatment).

That’s where biomarkers come in.

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Ideas fly at Proteomics 2011

“What is proteomics?” Answering this simple question was the motivation for the Proteomics 2011, an annual symposium hosted by Judith and Hanno Steen of the Steen & Steen lab and The Proteomics Center at Children’s, featuring global innovators and local advances in proteomics at Children’s Hospital Boston, held last week. As a video at the start of the symposium showed, it’s a question that elicits a wide range of answers:


Video courtesy of the Carino Agency.

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The shape of things to come

Detailed image of a bacterial enzyme used to degrade a major organic pollutant.

Imagine you’re a long-suffering biologist, and imagine that the problem is figuring out the three-dimensional shape of a very important molecule. The solution could lead to (a) new insights into disease and potential therapies, and (b) career advancement. What if someone gave you virtually unlimited computer power that could crack the problem you’re trying to solve overnight?

team at Children’s Hospital Boston has created a super-charged way of solving molecule shapes, harnessing idle scientific computer time across the country and around the world to survey vast reference databases – a “Google Shape” if you will.

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