Stories about: Rani George

Putting patients first in the translational research pipeline

During a follow-up visit, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.
During a follow-up visit at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Sung-Yun Pai, MD, hugs a patient who received gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

This is part II of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention. Read part I: Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine.

The hope to improve people’s lives is what drives many members of industry and academia to bring new products and therapies to market. At the BIO International Convention last week in Boston, there was lots of discussion about how translational science intersects with patients’ needs and why the best therapeutic developmental pipelines are consistently putting patients first.

As a case in point, Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s discussed his work to improve testing and translation of new therapies for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As a member of PACT (Preclinical Autism Consortium for Therapeutics) and director of Boston Children’s Translational Neuroscience Program, Sahin aims to bridge the gap between drug discovery and clinical translation.

“Our mission is to de-risk entry of new therapies in the ASD drug discovery and development space,” said Sahin, who is also a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.

One big challenge, says Sahin, is knowing how well — or how poorly — autism therapies are actually affecting people with ASD. Externally, ASD is recognized by its core symptoms of repetitive behaviors and social deficits.

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