Stories about: respiratory distress

Injectable oxygen getting closer to clinical reality

John Kheir, MD, first envisioned an injectable form of oxygen eight years ago, the night one of his patients, a nine-month-old girl, died after catastrophic lung failure. Kheir, a cardiac intensive care specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital, spoke last night to WBZ-TV’s Mallika Marshall, MD, about his efforts to try to buy precious time for children whose lungs stop working:

Want to know more? Read Kheir’s own words about his hopes and challenges for intravenous oxygen in a post he penned for Vector.

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Breathing an idea to life: Injectable oxygen microparticles

This syringe, containing particles of oxygen gas mixed with liquid, can potentially save the lives of patients unable to breathe -- like the infant Kheir was unable to save early in his career.

John Kheir, MD, is a staff physician and researcher in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Boston Children’s Hospital. As reported this week in Science Translational Medicine, he led a team that created a method for IV oxygen delivery — tiny particles filled with oxygen gas, mixed with liquid and injected directly into the blood. In an emergency, the injections could potentially buy clinicians time to start life-saving therapies. The technology was reported by The Atlantic, Popular Science, Scientific American, Technology Review and other outlets.

It was an ordinary Saturday night in the ICU at Boston Children’s, in the fall of 2006.  One of my patients was a 9-month-old girl who was admitted with pneumonia, and was having trouble breathing. I had gone in to check on her just a few minutes before; although she was not feeling well, she reached out and touched my hand as I examined her. I assured her mother she was in the best possible place for her care.

Five minutes later, the code bell alarmed. Our team rushed into her room to the most horrific sight I have ever seen.

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