Stories about: Rima Rachid

Could poop transplants treat peanut allergy? A clinical trial begins

FMT peanut allergy

Increasing evidence supports the idea that the bacteria living in our intestines early in life help shape our immune systems. Factors like cesarean birth, early antibiotics, having pets, number of siblings and formula feeding (rather than breastfeeding) may affect our microbial makeup, or microbiota, and may also affect our likelihood of developing allergies.

Could giving an allergic person the microbiota of a non-allergic person prevent allergic reactions? In a new clinical trial, a team led by Rima Rachid, MD, of Boston Children’s Division of Allergy and Immunology, is testing this idea in adults with severe peanut allergies. The microbiota will be delivered through fecal transplants — in the form of frozen, encapsulated poop pills.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

20-week treatment makes life safer for kids with peanut allergy

peanut allergy

A study last week in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests that exposing infants to peanuts can provide lasting protection against peanut allergy. But what about peanut-allergic children right now? They and their parents live a life of precautions — from pre-screening birthday party menus to segregation at the school lunch table — to avoid life-threatening consumption of even trace amounts of peanut.

Now, a multicenter study reports on a protocol combining the allergy medication omalizumab (Xolair) with controlled, gradually increasing peanut consumption. After 20 weeks, most initially allergic children could safely consume the equivalent of 8 to 10 peanuts at a time. Three months after stopping the medication, most had worked up to 16 to 20 peanuts.

Read Full Story | 1 Comment | Leave a Comment