Stories about: Robert’s Program

Gene panel helps investigate sudden unexpected death in children

Thousands of cases of sudden unexplaied death (SUDP) occur each year.
(PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK)

Almost 10 percent of pediatric deaths occur suddenly and without explanation. In this terrible situation, the first question many parents have is “Why?” For most, answers never come.

Childhood deaths that cannot be explained by traditional autopsy and death-scene investigation are referred to as sudden unexplained deaths in pediatrics (SUDP). In children, these deaths are more common than those from either cardiac disease or cancer and typically occur in infancy or early childhood.

Robert’s Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, co-founded by Richard Goldstein, MD, and Hannah Kinney, MD, is adding a genetic approach to the search for answers.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

SIDS associated with higher blood serotonin levels

A baby sleeping on its back, which is the safest sleeping position to prevent SIDS
The Safe to Sleep campaign has helped reduce SIDS deaths, but underlying causes for SIDS have largely remained mysterious.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) accounts for the greatest share of deaths in children between the ages of 1 and 12 months. What if a blood test could explain a third of SIDS deaths – and in the future, help prevent them? New findings by a Boston Children’s Hospital team show that an increased level of serotonin in blood serum may underpin some SIDS deaths and suggests the possibility that this biological vulnerability may one day be detected in the blood of living infants.

While there are known risk factors for SIDS — such as sleeping face-down or on soft surfaces — how and why such seemingly minor threats kill some children, and not others, remains a mystery.

“Research on the underlying pathology of SIDS is critical to further our understanding of the biological mechanisms contributing to a SIDS death,” says Robin Haynes, PhD, a researcher in the Department of Pathology at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment