Stories about: rotavirus

Science Seen: To deliver things into cells, do as rotavirus does

rotavirus cell entry - lessons for drug delivery
Courtesy Stephen Harrison

Rotavirus, a major cause of early childhood diarrhea, could have a lot to tell drug developers about how to deliver their products into cells.

Rotavirus doesn’t have an outer membrane, so it’s had to evolve a special system to infect cells. “Viruses with a membrane, like flu or HIV, can simply fuse that membrane with the membrane of the target cell and dump their contents inside the cell,” says Stephen Harrison, PhD, chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Rotavirus does something different, Harrison’s lab has found. First, each virion attaches itself to the cell membrane and wraps itself inside it. Next, its outer proteins, VP4 (the red spikes above) and VP7 (in yellow), disrupt that membrane — and are stripped off in a matter of seconds.

“If you will, they’re the booster the rocket has to shed so the payload can continue,” says Harrison.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment