Stories about: schizophrenia

The genetics of early-onset psychosis: Could it aid understanding of schizophrenia?

psychosis schizophrenia
(Thomas Zapata/Wikimedia Commons)

At age six, Matthew (not his real name) began hearing voices coming out of the walls and the school intercom, telling him to hurt himself and others. He saw ghosts, aliens in trees and color footprints. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD, a psychiatrist at Boston Children’s Hospital, put Matthew, at age 9, on antipsychotic medications, and the hallucinations stopped.

It’s rare for children so young to have psychotic symptoms. Intrigued, Gonzalez-Heydrich referred Matthew for genetic testing.

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Genetic analysis backs a neuroimmune view of schizophrenia: Complement gone amok

schizophrenia C4
C4 (in green) located at the synapses of human neurons. (Courtesy Heather de Rivera, McCarroll lab)

A deep genetic analysis, involving nearly 65,000 people, finds a surprising risk factor for schizophrenia: variation in an immune molecule best known for its role in containing infection, known as complement component 4 or C4.

The findings, published this week in Nature, also support the emerging idea that schizophrenia is a disease of synaptic pruning, and could lead to much-needed new approaches to this elusive, devastating illness.

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Parvalbumin neurons—new insight into the workings of a superhero brain cell

Superhero Cell 6-Parizad BilimoriaSay you’re a scientist in a movie, and you want to find out what gives a superhero his powers. You’d investigate any special suits he wears, whether he drinks any potions and what they are, right? Real-life scientists are following the same strategy to understand a powerful group of specialized brain cells.

Parvalbumin cells (PV-cells) are a population of inhibitory neurons found throughout the cerebral cortex. While small in number and size, they have the impressive capability to synchronize the electrical activities of other brain cells and orchestrate the timing of critical periods, interludes when the brain is more “plastic” and amenable to rewiring. Abnormalities in these pivotal cells are believed to make plasticity go awry, playing an important role in autism, schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

“The PV-cell is vulnerable in many mental illnesses,” says Takao K. Hensch, PhD, of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and professor of molecular and cellular biology and neurology at Harvard University. “So if we can find a way to maintain its health and well-being, then we might have a way to treat neurodevelopmental disorders, even later in life.”

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