Stories about: Scott Pomeroy

A Manhattan Project for the brain, at age 50

Formation of the IDDRCs in the 1960s launched a Manhattan project for the brain.
Landmark federal legislation in JFK’s final days launched an explosion of neuroscience research. (PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: NANCY FLIESLER/ADOBE STOCK)

On October 30th, 2018, Boston Children’s will be marking the 50th anniversary of the founding of its Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center.

As the African-American civil rights movement was flowering in the 1960s, a less visible civil rights movement was dawning. And so was a revolution in science that may outshine that spurred by the U.S. space program.

It was a time when children with what is now called intellectual disability (ID) or developmental disability (DD) were “excused” from school and routinely abandoned to institutions. “Schools” like the Fernald Center in Massachusetts and the Willowbrook State School in New York housed thousands of residents.

Some participated in research, but not the kind you might think. At Willowbrook, children were deliberately infected with hepatitis to test a new treatment. At Fernald, they were deliberately exposed to radiation in an experiment approved by the Atomic Energy Commission. Institutional review boards did not then exist.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy convened a panel to propose a “National Action to Combat Mental Retardation,” at the strong urging of his sister Eunice Kennedy Shriver. Three weeks before JFK’s assassination, the first legislation passed. It changed the course of history.

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Typing medulloblastoma: From RNA to proteomics and phospho-proteomics

medulloblastoma proteomics study
Medulloblastoma (CREDIT: ARMED FORCES INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY/WIKIMEDIA)

Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain tumors, accounting for nearly 10 percent of cases. It occurs in the cerebellum, a complex part of the brain that controls balance, coordination and motor function and regulates verbal expression and emotional modulation. While overall survival rates are high, current therapies can be toxic and cause secondary cancers. Developing alternative therapeutics is a priority for the field.

As early as the 1990s, the lab of Scott Pomeroy, MD, PhD, neurologist-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, discovered molecules in medulloblastoma tumors that could predict response to therapies. In 2010, Pomeroy and colleagues uncovered four distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma.

The World Health Organization updated the brain tumor classification scheme in 2016 to include these molecular and genetic features. In the new scheme, tumor subtypes with a good molecular prognosis receive less radiation and chemotherapy. But the creation of targeted therapeutics has remained a challenge, since some of the genetic pathways implicated in these subtypes are found in non-cancerous cells.

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Beyond appearances: Molecular genetics revises brain tumor classification and care

What a brain tumor looks like isn’t the best predictor of prognosis. (Jensflorian/Wikimedia Commons)
What a brain tumor looks like isn’t the best predictor of prognosis. (Jensflorian/Wikimedia Commons)

Scott PomeroyScott Pomeroy, MD, PhD, is Neurologist-in-Chief at Boston Children’s Hospital. He practices in the Brain Tumor Center and is a member of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center.

For almost a century, brain tumors have been diagnosed based on their appearance under a microscope and classified by their resemblance to the brain cells from which they are derived. For example, astrocytoma ends with “-oma” to designate that it is a tumor derived from astrocytes. In some cases, especially in children, brain tumors resemble cells in the developing brain and are named for the cells from which they are presumed to arise, such as pineoblastoma for developing cells within the pineal gland or medulloblastoma for developing cells within the cerebellum or brainstem.

In June, the World Health Organization (WHO), which sets the worldwide standard, released an updated brain tumor classification scheme that, for the first time, includes molecular and genetic features.

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