Stories about: Scott Snapper

Patients with epilepsy and inflammatory bowel disease to get DNA sequenced in study

3000 exomes study to sequence patients with epilepsy, IBD
ILLUSTRATION: ADOBE STOCK

Boston Children’s Hospital has embarked on a strategic initiative to accelerate and expand its research genomics gateway, with plans to sequence the DNA of 3,000 patients with epilepsy or inflammatory bowel disease and their family members. Patients will have access to enroll in this pilot study if their condition is of likely genetic origin but lack a diagnosis after initial clinical genetic testing.

Sequencing will cover the entire exome, containing all of a person’s protein-coding genes. The Epilepsy and IBD were chosen for the pilot because Ann Poduri, MD, MPH and Scott Snapper, MD, PhD, have already made huge inroads into the genetics of these respective disorders. Both have built large, well characterized patient databases for research purposes, have disease-specific genetic expertise and have begun using their findings to inform their patients’ care.

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Cell therapy for early-onset inflammatory bowel disease?

Macrophage therapy early-onset IBD
Giving patients the right kind of immune cells could curb their IBD, research suggests.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is miserable for anyone, but when it strikes a child under age 5, it’s much more severe, usually causing bloody diarrhea, wrenching abdominal pain and stunted growth. Early-onset IBD is rare, but on the rise: For reasons unknown, its incidence is increasing by about 5 percent per year in some parts of the world.

A recently identified form of early-onset IBD shows up within months of birth, causing severe inflammation in the large intestine and abscesses around the anus. Recently linked to genetic mutations in the cellular receptor for a signaling protein, interleukin-10 (IL-10), it can also lead to lymphoma later in life.

As with all early-onset IBD, IL-10-receptor deficiency has no good treatment. A bone marrow transplant is actually curative, but carries many risks, especially in infants.

“We’ve been trying to understand why IBD in these children is so severe and presents so early,” says Dror Shouval, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and a fellow in the lab of Scott Snapper, MD, PhD. The beginnings of such an understanding—detailed recently in the journal Immunity—could lead to a new treatment approach for this and perhaps other kinds of early-onset IBD.

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