Stories about: Seth Rakoff-Nahoum

Food for thought: How your microbiome celebrates Thanksgiving

Image of microbiome superimposed over a Thanksgiving turkeySeth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, a Boston Children’s Hospital physician-scientist who does infectious disease research and is taking an evolutionary approach to understanding the human microbiome and its effect on health, offers us some insight into what’s happening to the bugs in our gut as a result of the Thanksgiving meal. 

Q: Does the traditional American Thanksgiving meal affect the human microbiome?

A: Anything you put in your body has the potential to affect your microbiome, and Thanksgiving dinner is no different.

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Another microbiome perspective: The host holds the leash

Abstract depiction of the microbiome

Most scientists and clinicians accept that the human microbiome impacts a person’s nutrition, immune system function, physical health and perhaps even mental illness, but exactly how or why is not well understood. Now, taking an evolutionary approach, a Boston Children’s Hospital infectious disease researcher suggests the host may play a more active role in controlling the microbiome than previously appreciated.

“I think we need to re-evaluate the way in which we think about the microbiome,” says Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, a physician-scientist at Boston Children’s in the Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology, whose perspective was published today in Nature.

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Of bugs, genes, development and intestinal biology

genes intestinal developmentThe collection of bacteria and other microorganisms living in our intestines—our microbiota—is now understood to play an important role in our physiology. Recent research indicates that it helps regulate our metabolism, immune system and other biological processes, and that imbalances in the microbiota are associated with everything from inflammatory bowel disease to diabetes.

Seth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, wants to take this understanding to a new level. An infectious disease clinical fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, he has systematically probed how genetics interact with environment—including the microbiota—to shape intestinal biology during different stages of development.

His investigations provide interesting clues to disorders that have their origins early in life, ranging from necrotizing enterocolitis in newborns to Hirschsprung’s disease (marked by poor intestinal motility) to food allergies.

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