Stories about: Simulator Program

Clinical simulation training goes to the dogs

clinical simulation

Boston Children’s Hospital’s fast-growing Simulator Program, SIMPeds, creates medical scenarios for clinical teams to practice challenging procedures and situations in a risk-free environment. Now serving 27 departments and divisions at the hospital, SIMPeds’ customized simulations prepare clinicians for everything from a Code Blue to complex surgery to breaking difficult news to parents.

At the Simulation Center this week, there was one special team member being trained: Rafa, a Miniature Australian Shepherd auditioning to be part of Pawprints, Boston Children’s dog visitation program. Not all dogs are behaviorally up to the job when confronted with a hospital environment. So the SIM team created a mock intensive-care-unit patient room, fully equipped and complete with an overly enthusiastic child (overwhelming for some dogs), played by SIM engineer Katie Fitzpatrick. As Rafa interacted with the “patient,” the SIM staff set off alarms, had “doctors” and “nurses” come in and out and staged other hospital things that might distract or make a dog skittish.

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3D-printed models assist complex brain surgery for encephalocele

Encephalocele 3D printing

At five months’ gestation, Bentley Yoder was given little chance to live. A routine 20-week “gender reveal” ultrasound showed that a large portion of his brain was growing outside of his skull, a malformation known as an encephalocele. But he was moving and kicking and had a strong heartbeat, so his parents, Sierra and Dustin, carried on with the pregnancy.

Born through a normal vaginal delivery (the doctors felt that a C-section would interfere with Sierra’s grieving process), Bentley surprised everyone by thriving and meeting most of his baby milestones.

But the large protuberance on his head was holding him back. It steadily got larger, filling with cerebrospinal fluid. Bentley couldn’t hold his head up for more than a few seconds.

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Medicine meets theater: Pediatrics training, parent practice, device innovation ‘on location’

medical simulation

Pediatric medicine just took a step for the better in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area with a new, expanded pediatric Simulation (SIM) Center — a dedicated space where doctors, nurses and other staff can rehearse tough medical situations or practice tricky or rare procedures in a clinical setting that looks and feels real.

But clinicians aren’t the only ones who will be using the new 4,000-square-foot facility, which incorporates real medical equipment, set design and special effects.

Families can get hands-on practice with medical equipment they’ll be using at home. Inventors and “hackers” can develop and test new devices or software platforms and see how they perform in a life-like clinical environment. Planned hacks, for example, will explore different medical and surgical applications for voice-activated and gesture-controlled devices.

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Surgical 3-D printing: 300 prints, 16 specialties and counting

3-D printing is rapidly becoming a part of surgical planning. Since July 2013, Boston Children’s Hospital’s 3-D printing service, part of the Simulator Program, has received about 200 requests from 16 departments around the hospital. It’s generated a total of about 300 prints, most of them replicating parts of the body to be operated on.

Most prints take between 4 and 28 hours to produce. The largest to date—an entire malformed rib cage—took 105 hours and 35 minutes to create and weighed 8.9 pounds. The smallest—a tiny tangle of blood vessels in the brain—took 4 hours and 21 minutes and weighed 1.34 ounces. Here is sampling of what’s been coming off the production line.

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Surgical Sam, a beating-heart mannequin, takes the stage

Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupWe often see medical magic in Hollywood, but it’s not often we see Hollywood magic brought into medicine. Now, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Simulator Program and special-effects collaborators at The Chamberlain Group (TCG) have done just that.

Simulation has become a key component in team training, crisis management, surgical practice and other medical training activities. With simulation, medical teams can add to and hone their skills in an environment where people can make mistakes without risking patient harm—”practicing before game time,” says Boston Children’s critical care specialist Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD, who runs the Simulator Program.

Mannequins are a key part of simulation, and Weinstock’s team, working together with companies, designers and engineers, has developed eerily lifelike ones that can bleed and “respond” to interventions based on computer commands from a technician.

But there are some things Weinstock’s mannequins haven’t been able to capture up to now, like the movements of a beating heart.

That’s where TCG and a new mannequin called Surgical Sam come in.

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