Stories about: sleep

To address chronic pain, you need to address sleep

chronic pain
Acute or chronic sleep loss exacerbates pain, finds a study that kept mice awake for long periods by entertaining them.

The ongoing opioid epidemic underscores the dire need for new pain medications that aren’t addicting. New research published today in Nature Medicine suggests a possible avenue of relief for people with chronic pain: simply getting more sleep, or, failing that, taking medications to promote wakefulness.

In an unusually rigorous mouse study, either approach relieved pain better than ibuprofen or even morphine. The findings reveal an unexpected role for alertness in setting pain sensitivity.

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It’s not just how long teens sleep, but when, that’s important to self-regulation

teen sleep

Chronic insufficient sleep is at epidemic levels in U.S. teens. It’s been associated with depression, substance use, accidents and academic failure. But according to a survey of some 2,000 7th to 12th graders in Fairfax County, VA, the number of hours of sleep isn’t the core problem. It’s being a “night owl” — unable to fall asleep until late at night.

Forced to get up early for school, night owls are in a state of chronic “jet lag” on school days. And that can lead to poor self-regulation, or an inability to alter thinking, emotions and behaviors to meet varying social demands, finds the study, published last week by Pediatrics.

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Whether sleep environment is safe or not, SIDS is linked to brainstem abnormality

SIDS
Inborn vulnerabilities can tip infants toward SIDS.

Epidemiologic studies have shown that infants who die suddenly, unexpectedly and without explanation—what’s referred to as sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS—are often found sleeping face down with their face in the pillow, or sleeping next to an adult. These are environments that have the potential to cause smothering and asphyxiation. By advising parents to have infants sleep on their backs, in a separate crib or bed, the government’s Safe to Sleep campaign (formerly known as Back to Sleep) has greatly reduced deaths from SIDS.

Hannah Kinney, MD, a neuropathologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, is clear that this campaign must go forward—it’s saved thousands of lives. But still, she receives calls from parents and grandparents haunted by their infants’ death, feeling at fault and wanting a second opinion.

And in many cases, she has been able to document abnormalities in brainstem circuits that help control breathing, heart rate, blood pressure and temperature control during sleep.

What’s lacking is early detection and treatment.

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