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Gene active before birth regulates brain folding, speech motor development

SCN3A, linked to polymicrogyria, regulates speech motor development
ILLUSTRATIONS: RICHARD SMITH/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

A handful of families from around the world with a rare brain malformation called polymicrogyria have led scientists to discover a new gene that helps us speak and swallow.

The gene, SCN3A, is turned “on” primarily during fetal brain development. When it’s mutated, a language area of the brain known as the perisylvian cortex develops multiple abnormally small folds, appearing bumpy. People with polymicrogyria in this region often have impaired oral motor development, including difficulties with swallowing, tongue movement and articulating words — especially if the polymicrogyria affects both sides of the brain.

The new study, published today in Neuron, ties together human genetics, measurements of electrical currents generated by neurons, studies of ferrets and more to start to connect the dots between SCN3A, the brain malformation and the oral motor impairment.

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