Stories about: startups

Developing a startup: bringing your healthcare innovation to market

a digital health startup

Sixth and last in an on-going series of Innovator’s Roadmap posts from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA). Matt Murphy is Innovation Lead at IDHA.

We recently provided guidelines for selecting a platform and developing a Minimal Viable Product to take your digital health innovation beyond the prototype stage and create meaningful iterations. Once a Minimum Viable Product has been developed, numerous commercialization pathways are available, such as licensing an innovation to an existing company. But for many innovators, the best path may involve forming a startup company.

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Accessing startup resources: 10 tips for physicians and scientists

accessing startup resources

How do you get companies or investors to support your project in a startup world where “many are called, few are chosen?”

Vector attended a panel last week on the subject, moderated by Ryan Dietz, Senior Licensing Manager at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO). The panelists were:

Below is their distilled advice for physicians and scientists seeking to commercialize a drug discovery, device or health app.

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Treating chronic pain: From humans to mice and back

"Reverse engineering" reveals the enzyme sepiapterin reductase (SPR)—the large gray molecule in the background—as a new target for pain treatment. This take on Michelangelo's famous Sistine Chapel image symbolizes the link between human pain patients and the mouse model. The lab-designed SPR inhibitor (in green), shown within SPR’s active pocket, is the "bridge" between the two species. (Image: Alban Latremoliere)
“Reverse engineering” reveals the enzyme sepiapterin reductase (SPR)—the large gray molecule in the background—as a new target for pain treatment. This take on Michelangelo’s famous Sistine Chapel image symbolizes the link between human pain patients and the mouse model. The lab-designed SPR inhibitor in green, shown within SPR’s active pocket, is the “bridge” between the two species. (Image: Alban Latremoliere)

Non-narcotic treatments for chronic pain that work well in people, not just mice, are sorely needed. Drawing from human pain genetics, an international team demonstrates a way to break the cycle of pain hypersensitivity without the development of addiction, tolerance or side effects. Their findings were published online today in the journal Neuron.

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