Stories about: T cells

“Teenage” red blood cells could hold the key to a malaria vaccine

A T cell (right) launches an attack on an immature red blood cell called a reticulocyte. This immune response could help design a malaria vaccine.
A T cell (right) launches an attack on an immature red blood cell (left) infected with a malaria parasite called P. vivax. At the arrow, the T cell breaches the infected cell’s membrane to deliver death-inducing enzymes. Credit: Lieberman lab/Boston Children’s Hospital

Malaria parasite infection, which affects our red blood cells, can be fatal. Currently, there are about 200 million malaria infections in the world each year and more than 400,000 people, mostly children, die of malaria each year.

Now, studying blood samples from patients treated for malaria at a clinical field station in Brazil’s Amazon jungle, a team of Brazilian and American researchers has made a surprising discovery that could open the door to a new vaccine.

“I noticed that white blood cells called killer T cells were activated in response to malaria parasite infection of immature red blood cells,” says Caroline Junqueira, PhD, a visiting scientist at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School (HMS).

For red blood cells, this activity is unusual.

“Infected red blood cells aren’t recognized by our immune system’s T cells in the same way that most other infected cells of the human body are,” says Judy Lieberman, MD, PhD, chair in the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Digging deeper, Junqueira, Lieberman and collaborators have found a completely unexpected immune response to malaria parasites that infect immature blood cells called reticulocytes. The revelation could help to design a new vaccine that might be capable of preventing malaria.

Their findings, published today in Nature Medicineuncover special cellular mechanisms and properties specific to “teenaged” reticulocytes and a strain of malaria called Plasmodium vivax that enable our T cells to recognize and destroy both the infected reticulocytes and the parasites inside them.

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Skewed T-cell pathway may help explain transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases

Th17 transplant rejection
Researchers discover a pathway that controls our T helper cell profiles (Fawn Gracey illustration)

Second in a two-part series on transplant tolerance. (See part one.)

Our immune system has two major kinds of T cells. T helper cells, also known as effector T cells, tend to rev up our immune responses, while T regulatory cells tend to suppress or downregulate them. Last week we reported that bolstering populations of T regulatory cells might help people tolerate organ transplants better. A new study turned its focus to T helper cells, and found that an imbalance of these cells causes an exaggerated immune response that may also contribute to transplant rejection.

The study also showed, in mice and in human cells in a dish, that the immune imbalance can be potentially reversed pharmacologically. Findings were published yesterday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Can we tip the immune system toward transplant tolerance?

Shifting the balance of T cells toward Tregs might promote transplant tolerance
Turning on the DEPTOR gene shifts the immune system balance toward regulatory T cells (Tregs). This might promote transplant tolerance and perhaps curb autoimmune disorders. (Illustration: Fawn Gracey)

First in a two-part series on transplant tolerance. Read part two.

Although organ transplant recipients take drugs to suppress the inflammatory immune response, almost all eventually lose their transplant. A new approach, perhaps added to standard immunosuppressant treatment, could greatly enhance people’s long-term transplant tolerance, report researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The approach, which has only been tested in mice as of yet, works by maintaining a population of T cells that naturally temper immune responses. It does so by turning on a gene called DEPTOR, which itself acts as a genetic regulator. In a study published July 3 in the American Journal of Transplantation, boosting DEPTOR in T cells enabled heart transplants to survive in mice much longer than usual.

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A new tactic for eczema? A newly identified brake on the allergic attack

baby with eczema
(Arkady Chubykin/Adobe Stock)

Eczema affects about 17 percent of children in developed countries. Often, it’s a gateway to food allergy and asthma, initiating an “atopic march” toward broader allergic sensitization. There are treatments – steroid creams and a recently approved biologic – but they are expensive or have side effects. A new study in Science Immunology suggests a different approach to eczema, one that stimulates a natural brake on the allergic attack.

The skin inflammation of eczema is known to be driven by “type 2” immune responses. These are led by activated T helper 2 (TH2) cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), together known as effector cells. Another group of T cells, known as regulatory T cells or Tregs, are known to temper type 2 responses, thereby suppressing the allergic response.

Yet, if you examine an eczema lesion, the numbers of Tregs are unchanged. Interestingly, Tregs comprise only about 5 percent of the body’s T cells, but up to 50 percent of T cells in the skin.

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More surprises about blood development — and a possible lead for making lymphocytes

blood development chart
Blood development in the embryo begins with cells that make myeloid and erythroid cells – but not lymphoid cells. Why? A partial answer is in today’s Nature.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have long been regarded as the granddaddy of all blood cells. After we’re born, these multipotent cells give rise to all our cell lineages: lymphoid, myeloid and erythroid cells. Hematologists have long focused on capturing HSCs’ emergence in the embryo, hoping to recreate the process in the lab to provide a source of therapeutic blood cells.

But in the embryo, oddly enough, blood development unfolds differently. The first blood cells to show up are already partly differentiated. These so-called “committed progenitors” give rise only to erythroid and myeloid cells — not lymphoid cells like the immune system’s B and T lymphocytes.

Researchers in the lab of George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, part of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Stem Cell Research program, wanted to know why. Does nature deliberately suppress blood cell multipotency in early embryonic development? And could this offer clues about how to reinstate multipotency and more readily generate different blood cell types?

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Protecting immune cells from exhaustion

T cell exhaustion
Boosting a naturally occurring protein could prevent T-cells from burning out

Run the first half of a marathon as fast as you can and you’ll likely never finish the race. Run an engine at top speed for too long and you’ll burn it out.

The same principle seems to apply to our T cells, which power the immune system’s battle with chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis B, as well as cancer. Too often, they succumb to “T cell exhaustion” and lose their capacity to attack infected or malignant cells. But could T cells learn to pace themselves and run the full marathon?

That’s the thinking behind a research study published last week by The Journal of Experimental Medicine. “Our research provides a clear explanation for why T cells lose their fighting ability,” says Florian Winau, MD, “and describes the countervailing process that protects their effectiveness.”

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