Stories about: therapeutics

Super suppressor: Boosting a gene that stifles tumor growth

Researchers have packaged a tumor suppressor into a therapeutic nanoparticle.
Researchers have packaged a tumor suppressor into a therapeutic nanoparticle. IMAGE: ISLAM, ET AL.

Most of the time, cancer cells do a combination of two things: they overexpress genes that drive tumor growth and they lose normal genes that typically suppress tumors. No two tumors are exactly alike, but some combination of these two effects is usually what results in cancer. Now, for the first time, researchers have shown that it’s possible to treat cancer by delivering a gene that naturally suppresses tumors.

Researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center combined their cancer biology and nanomaterials expertise and developed a therapeutic capable of delivering a tumor suppressor gene known as PTEN, the loss of which can allow tumors to grow unchecked.

In several preclinical models, their PTENboosting therapeutic was able to inhibit tumor growth. Their findings were published yesterday in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

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A bold strategy to enhance CAR T-cell therapies, capable of targeting DIPG and other tough-to-treat cancers

CAR T-cell therapy uses a patient's own genetically modified T cells to attack cancer, as pictured here, where T cells surround a cancer cell.
T cells surround a cancer cell. Credit: National Institutes of Health

A Boston-based team of researchers, made up of scientists and pediatric oncologists, believe a better CAR T-cell therapy is on the horizon.

They say it could treat a range of cancers — including the notorious, universally-fatal childhood brain cancer known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma or DIPG — by targeting tumor cells in an exclusive manner that reduces life-threatening side effects (such as off-target toxicities and cytokine release syndrome). The team, led by Carl Novina, MD, PhD, and Mark Kieran, MD, PhD, of the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, calls their approach “small molecule CAR T-cell therapy.”

Their plan is to optimize the ability for CAR T-cell therapies, which use a patient’s genetically modified T cells to combat cancer, to more specifically kill tumor cells without setting off an immune response “storm” known as cytokine release syndrome. The key ingredient is a unique small molecule that greatly enhances the specificity of the tumor targeting component of the therapy.

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News Note: A fresh perspective on RNA with big implications for drug development 

RNA-based drugs are the future of therapeuticsRibonucleic acid, or RNA, has long been underappreciated for its role in gene expression. Until recent years, RNA has been thought of merely as a messenger, shuttling DNA’s instructions to the genetic machinery that synthesizes proteins.

But new discoveries of RNA functions, modifications and its ability to transcribe sections of the genome that were previously considered “junk DNA” has led to the discovery of a huge number of new druggable targets.

These new insights into RNA’s complex purposes have largely been uncovered through ever-increasingly sensitive and affordable sequencing methods. As a result, RNA-based drugs now stand to greatly extend our ability to treat diseases beyond the scope of what’s possible with small molecules and biologics.

Although several RND-based drug approaches have already been established, some barriers still prevent these strategies from working broadly. In a review paper for Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, Judy Lieberman, MD, PhD, of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine of Boston Children’s Hospital, lays out where RNA-based drug development currently stands.

Lieberman, who has helped pioneer the RNA-based drug revolution herself, was the first scientist to show in an animal disease model that small, double-stranded RNAs could be used as drugs and leveraged to knock down genes in cells.

Read Lieberman’s review: “Tapping the RNA world for therapeutics.”

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