Stories about: Tobias Loddenkemper

An eye on epilepsy: The work, life and innovations of Tobias Loddenkemper, MD

Epileptologist Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, director of clinical epilepsy research at Boston Children’s Hospital, is a seizure whisperer. He keeps a close watch on his patients, trying to discern seizure patterns and head off the developmental and learning problems that seizures can cause. A pioneer in the emerging field of chronoepileptology, he has partnered with Empatica and other companies to develop reliable seizure detection devices that could help doctors better time medication dosing and help prevent death from seizures, a real risk in children with severe epilepsy.

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Epilepsy surgery: When it’s not good to wait

epilepsy surgery life expectancyAbout a third of children with epilepsy do not get better with drug treatment. Many physicians are inclined to try additional drugs to control the seizures—and there are many to choose from. However, analysis of data from tens of thousands of patients suggests that if two or more well-chosen drugs have failed, and surgery is a safe option, there’s no benefit in holding off.

The decision analysis, published in the February issue of Epilepsia, found that average life expectancy was more than five years greater when eligible children had surgery rather than prolonged drug treatment. And children spent more of their lives seizure-free.

Although clinical guidelines currently do call for earlier surgery, physicians tend to use it as a last resort—even when brain-mapping studies indicate that it’s unlikely to endanger vital brain structures.

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Seizure detection: It’s all in the wrist

seizure wristband
This wristband can sound an alarm when a child is having a seizure, and can help doctors better time medication dosing.

Seizures are often hard to track in children with epilepsy, making it difficult for doctors to optimize their treatment. For parents, the greatest worry is that their child will have a life-threatening seizure in the middle of the night or away from home, unable to get help. And what about when that child goes off to college?

“Every parent asks, ‘What can I do to prevent my child from harm?’” says Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, a neurologist in the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Loddenkemper also wanted to better understand his patients’ seizure patterns so he could better time the dosing of their medications. He’s been testing a wristband sensor system, developed by Rosalind Picard, ScD, and colleagues at the MIT Media Lab (Epilepsia, March 20), and thinks it could be part of the solution.

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