Stories about: transcranial magnetic stimulation

Brain stimulation advances toward application in pediatrics

Rotenberg_AlexanderAlexander Rotenberg, MD, PhD, is a pediatric neurologist and epileptologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and director of the hospital’s Neuromodulation Program.

In recent years, electrical devices stimulating the brain or peripheral nerves have emerged as clinical and scientific tools in neurology and psychiatry. In 2014, the Food and Drug Administration has approved three tools at this writing: a device for treatment of epileptic seizures via electrodes implanted beneath the skull; a device for shortening migraine headache via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the brain; and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) device for migraine prevention. (Click image below for details.)

Stimulating the nervous system to treat neuropsychiatric symptoms is not new. In the first century AD, the Roman physician Scribonius Largus documented treating headaches by applying electric torpedo fish to the head.

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Magnetic brain stimulation advances to clinical trial for epilepsy

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for epilepsyPatients with severe epilepsy can have seizures every day – sometimes waking up on the floor, not knowing what happened. For about 1 in 3 epilepsy patients, drugs are of no help. An implanted vagus nerve stimulator can sometimes control seizures, but often not. Surgically removing the excitable brain tissue can be curative, but often, too many areas of the brain are involved to effectively remove the entire seizure focus. Or the area causing the seizures is too close to a vital brain area – say, a memory or motor area – making surgery too risky.

Alex Rotenberg, a neurologist in Children’s Hospital Boston’s epilepsy program, has been having success with an experimental technique for this kind of disabling, treatment-resistant epilepsy. Known as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), it has helped a small number of patients with no other good options for controlling their seizures.

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