Stories about: transcription factors

New research on blood stem cells takes root

Word cloud of words associated with hematopoietic stem cells and blood development.
The demand for hematopoietic stem cell transplants is rising. But how can we get more cells? (Text from Bryder D, Rossi DJ and Weissman IL. Am J Pathol 2006; 169(2): 338–346.)
You need a lot of hematopoietic stem cells to carry out a hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or HSCT. But getting enough blood stem cells can be quite a challenge.

There are many HSCs in the bone marrow, but getting them out in sufficient numbers is laborious—and for the donor, can be a painful process. Small numbers of HSCs circulate within the blood stream, but not nearly enough. And while umbilical cord blood from newborn babies may present a relatively rare but promising source for HSCs, a single cord generally contains fewer cells than are necessary.

And here’s the rub: The demand for HSCs is only going to increase. Once a last resort treatment for aggressive blood cancers, HSCTs are being used for a growing list of conditions, including some solid tumor cancers, non-malignant blood disorders and even a number of metabolic disorders.

So how do we get more blood stem cells? Several laboratories at Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center are approaching that question from different directions. But all are converging on the same end result: making more HSCs available for patients needing HSCTs.

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