Stories about: transcriptome

The 98%: Proteomics reveals proteins made from ‘noncoding’ DNA

proteins and peptides from noncoding DNA
Probing the genome's 'dark side' could change our view of biology.
Vast chunks of our DNA—fully 98 percent of our genome—are considered “non-coding,” meaning that they’re not thought to carry instructions to make proteins. Yet we already know that this “junk DNA” isn’t completely filler. For example, some sequences are known to code for bits of RNA that act as switches, turning genes on and off.

New research led by Judith Steen, PhD, and Gabriel Kreiman PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Proteomics Center and Neurobiology program, goes much further in mapping this “dark side” of the genome.

In a report published last month in Nature Communications, they describe a variety of proteins and peptides (smaller chains of amino acids) arising from presumed non-coding DNA sequences. Since they looked in just one type of cell—neurons—these molecules may only be the tip of a large, unexplored iceberg and could change our understanding of biology and disease.

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