Stories about: transplant tolerance

Skewed T-cell pathway may help explain transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases

Th17 transplant rejection
Researchers discover a pathway that controls our T helper cell profiles (Fawn Gracey illustration)

Second in a two-part series on transplant tolerance. (See part one.)

Our immune system has two major kinds of T cells. T helper cells, also known as effector T cells, tend to rev up our immune responses, while T regulatory cells tend to suppress or downregulate them. Last week we reported that bolstering populations of T regulatory cells might help people tolerate organ transplants better. A new study turned its focus to T helper cells, and found that an imbalance of these cells causes an exaggerated immune response that may also contribute to transplant rejection.

The study also showed, in mice and in human cells in a dish, that the immune imbalance can be potentially reversed pharmacologically. Findings were published yesterday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Can we tip the immune system toward transplant tolerance?

Shifting the balance of T cells toward Tregs might promote transplant tolerance
Turning on the DEPTOR gene shifts the immune system balance toward regulatory T cells (Tregs). This might promote transplant tolerance and perhaps curb autoimmune disorders. (Illustration: Fawn Gracey)

First in a two-part series on transplant tolerance. Read part two.

Although organ transplant recipients take drugs to suppress the inflammatory immune response, almost all eventually lose their transplant. A new approach, perhaps added to standard immunosuppressant treatment, could greatly enhance people’s long-term transplant tolerance, report researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The approach, which has only been tested in mice as of yet, works by maintaining a population of T cells that naturally temper immune responses. It does so by turning on a gene called DEPTOR, which itself acts as a genetic regulator. In a study published July 3 in the American Journal of Transplantation, boosting DEPTOR in T cells enabled heart transplants to survive in mice much longer than usual.

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Giving the immune system a new start, to prevent transplant rejection

Leveling the immune system might let the body rebuild one that’s tolerant of a transplanted kidney. (Photo: Tom Ulrich)

As the science of transplantation has gotten better, the patients whose lives are saved by other people’s organs are living longer and longer. But they’re paying a price—a lifetime of immunosuppressive drugs.  William Harmon, chief of Nephrology at Children’s Hospital Boston, is trying to change that.

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