Stories about: Twitter

So, what’s your digital phenotype?

Ideally, we’re all supposed to see our doctor once a year for a checkup. It’s an opportunity to see how we’re doing from a health perspective, address any concerns or issues that we may have and catch any emerging issues before they become true problems.

But those visits are really only one-time, infrequent snapshots of health. They don’t give a full view of how we’re doing or feeling.

Now, think for a moment about how often you post something to Facebook or Twitter. Do you post anything about whether you’re feeling ill or down, or haven’t slept well? Ever share how far you ran, the route you biked or your number of steps for the day?

Every time you do, you’re creating a data point—another snapshot—about your health. Put those data points together, and what starts to emerge is a rich view of your health, much richer than one based on the records of your occasional medical visit.

As John Brownstein, PhD—director of the Computational Epidemiology Group (CEG) in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program and the hospital’s new Chief Innovation Officer—explains in this episode of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Labcast (click the image above to hear it), this view has a name: your digital phenotype.

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Clinicians and social media: Finding the right relationship

doctor_social_media_shutterstock_264246836_260x260I remember the day about 15 years ago when my doctor tentatively gave me his email address, telling me he trusted that I wouldn’t abuse it. (For the record, I’ve used that address maybe five times.)

Fast forward to today, where doctors and nurses are frequently on social media the same as the rest of us, usually behaving well, sometimes not.

What place do social media have in a physician or nurse’s career? And where do the boundaries lie?

Read the full story on Boston Children’s Hospital’s new blog for healthcare providers, Notes.

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Digital disease detection: We see the trends, but who is actually sick?

Three teenagers wearing hospital masks flu influenza healthmap social media twitter digital epidemiology digital disease detectionElaine Nsoesie, PhD, is a research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital’s HealthMap, Harvard Medical School and Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. In this post, which originally appeared on HealthMap’s Disease Daily, Nsoesie looks at the trend of detecting disease digitally by monitoring mentions on social media. She delves into one of the major limitations of this technique—namely telling those who are curious about a disease apart from those who actually have it.

There are plenty of studies about tracking diseases (such as influenza) using digital data sources, which is awesome! However, many of these studies focus solely on matching the trends in the digital data sources (for example, searches on disease-related terms, or how frequently certain disease-related terms are mentioned on social media over time, etc.) to data from official sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although this approach is useful in telling us about the possible utility of these data, there are several limitations. One of the main limitations is the difficulty in distinguishing between data generated by healthy individuals and individuals who are actually sick. In other words, how can we tell whether someone who searches Google or Wikipedia for influenza is sick or just curious about the flu?

Researchers at Penn State University have developed a system that seeks to deal with this limitation. We spoke to the lead author, Todd Bodnar, about the study titled, On the Ground Validation of Online Diagnosis with Twitter and Medical Records.

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BioPharm 2011: Why the life science industry needs Twitter

(Photo: Chinen Keiya/Flickr)

Like many, I have a Facebook page where I share funny travel stories and cute pictures of my cat with friends and family. But for a long time I didn’t understand how such a platform, and others like Twitter, could affect how business is conducted in the life science industry, and how it fit in my own professional life as a hospital technology licensing manager.

I didn’t get it until a tweet from my colleague and fellow blogger Keeley Wray (@Market_Spy) established a direct contact with a regenerative medicine company potentially interested in a cell-based technology in my portfolio. I was surprised: so Twitter isn’t just for celebrities pushing their albums, movies and perfumes to millions of fans? Consequently, six months ago, I enthusiastically joined the Twitterverse (@maude_tessier) and haven’t looked back.

I’m not the only one recognizing the power of social media in the work that pharma, biotech and academic medical institutions do. Last week at the BioPharm America conference, a 90-minute interactive roundtable discussion emphasized the use of social media to help achieve business objectives.

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