Stories about: type 1 diabetes

Transfusing engineered red blood cells to protect against autoimmune disease

Red blood cells, pictured here, could be engineered to protect against autoimmune disease
Transfusions of engineered red blood cells could help prevent and/or treat autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune disease is usually treated using general immunosuppressants. But this non-targeted therapy leaves the body more susceptible to infection and other life-threatening diseases.

Now, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research think they may have found a targeted way to protect the body from autoimmune disease. Their approach, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses transfusions of engineered red blood cells to re-train the immune system. Early experiments in mice have already shown that the approach can prevent — and even reverse — clinical signs of two autoimmune diseases: a multiple-sclerosis (MS)-like condition and Type 1 diabetes.

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Science seen: Stealthy beta cell transplants for diabetes

diabetes encapsulated beta cells Daniel Anderson
Type 1 diabetes afflicts more than 300 million people worldwide. Researchers have long sought a way to replace the insulin-producing beta cells lost in the disease, but transplanted cells are susceptible to immune attack. In this image, beta cells generated from human embryonic stem cells are encapsulated in microspheres made from a material called alginate, which help cloak the cells from the immune system. However, the reddish, blue and green markers on the spheres’ surfaces indicate that immune cells have discovered spheres and their cargo, and begun to block them off from the rest of the body.

In simultaneous papers in Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology, Daniel Anderson, PhD — a professor of applied biology at MIT and a researcher in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative and Pain Medicine — and his collaborators reported on their search for effective cloaking materials They also announced that microsphere-encapsulated beta cells can reverse diabetes in a mouse model. With further work on the microspheres’ chemistry and geometry, the team hopes to improve their cloaking abilities and provide longer lasting protection for beta cells. (Image: Andrew Bader, Omid Veiseh, Arturo Vegas, Anderson/Langer Laboratory, Koch Institute at MIT)

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Silencing immune attacks in type 1 diabetes

Could diabetes be treated without insulin shots? (Tess Watson/Flickr)
Could diabetes be treated without insulin shots? (Tess Watson/Flickr)

For decades, patients have managed their type 1 diabetes by injecting themselves with insulin to regulate the glucose in their blood. While this form of medical management addresses the immediate danger of low insulin levels, long-term complications associated with diabetes, like heart and kidney diseases, still threaten more than 215,000 children currently living with the disease in the United States.

“Insulin injections can manage hyperglycemia by reducing the patient’s glucose levels, but it is not the cure,” says Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of the Nephrology Division at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Fiorina is currently involved in new research targeting a molecular pathway that triggers diabetes in the first place—potentially providing a permanent cure. It could potentially change the face of diabetes treatment in children.

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Could more time online improve teens’ health? For diabetes, possibly

Teens with type 1 diabetes can download their blood glucose data and attend "virtual clinics" from home.
Most adolescents fight for the freedom to manage their own lives, especially when it comes to friends, curfews and hobbies. That excitement conspicuously slips away when they’re faced with managing something less glamorous—like diabetes.

Since diabetes is a chronic illness with potentially serious risks, it requires continuous management. But adolescents aren’t exactly lining up around the block for extra medical visits.

“Some adolescents forget to do things like take insulin or check their blood glucose level, and they could benefit from more frequent check-ins with their diabetes team,” says Erinn Rhodes, MD, MPH, director of the Type 2 Diabetes Program and Inpatient Diabetes Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “But that’s not easy, especially if time is limited or if transportation is a challenge.”

So Rhodes has designed a study for adolescents 13 to 17 years old, to see if “televisits”—video conferences between teens and their diabetes care providers—can improve their diabetes while encouraging better self-management.

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